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Silicon photonics is hot, OpenFlow is not

10/11/2012 06:28 PM EDT
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Scott SG.
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re: Silicon photonics is hot, OpenFlow is not
Scott SG.   10/15/2012 6:56:29 PM
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I'm not disagreeing with your analysis, but the reason DEC no longer exists is that Intel bought it as part of the settlement of the patent lawsuit brought by DEC against Intel. Intel had no reason to keep producing the Alpha or keep the DEC name past the agreed period. It pays to be the 880 lb. gorilla.

Adele.Hars
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re: Silicon photonics is hot, OpenFlow is not
Adele.Hars   10/16/2012 9:50:18 AM
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Just by way of reminder, silicon photonics is very much an SOI-based technology. See http://www.advancedsubstratenews.com/tag/photonics/ for articles explaining the role of SOI in photonics by Intel, IBM, Luxtera, Sony and more.

DMcCunney
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re: Silicon photonics is hot, OpenFlow is not
DMcCunney   10/17/2012 7:50:22 PM
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Well, the Alpha no longer exists because Intel bought it and stopped making it. DEC's demise is a little more complicated, as DEC had been selling of parts trying to stay alive before what was left was acquired by Compaq. Far that matter, DEC competitor Data General suffered a similar fate. They made the AViiON line, originally based on the Motorola 88000 RISC processor, and shifted to Intel when Motorola dropped the 88000. DG was eventually purchased by storage vendor EMC, who bought them to get the CLARiiON storage system, and promptly stopped making the computer. But yeah, it pays to be the 800lb gorilla. It's yet another acquisition made to buy and kill off a potential competitor.

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