Breaking News
News & Analysis

Texas Instruments plans to boost Chinese manufacturing

6/12/2013 02:47 PM EDT
7 comments
NO RATINGS
More Related Links
View Comments: Oldest First | Newest First | Threaded View
geekmaster
User Rank
Author
re: Texas Instruments plans to boost Chinese manufacturing
geekmaster   6/12/2013 4:25:31 PM
NO RATINGS
TI seems to be committed to a fab-strong strategy. I wonder how this will turn out for them as many competitors have a fab-lite or fab-less approach.

Peter Clarke
User Rank
Author
re: Texas Instruments plans to boost Chinese manufacturing
Peter Clarke   6/12/2013 5:13:43 PM
NO RATINGS
@GoGoGeek You call it fab-strong but please note that TI is committed to spending just 4 percent of revenue on capital expenditure. This a comparatively low figure. ST is expected to spend $600 million capex on revenue of $8bn to $9bn in 2013, which is about 6 to 7 percent. Also note that the $1.7 billion, which may include a significant contribution from China or may be additional to that contribution, is spread over 15 years. $100 million per year is not aggressive. $1.7 billion is not much to spend at a wafer fab site these days although it does buy you a reasonable amout of test, assembly and packaging facilities and equipment.

kjdsfkjdshfkdshfvc
User Rank
Author
re: Texas Instruments plans to boost Chinese manufacturing
kjdsfkjdshfkdshfvc   6/12/2013 5:54:13 PM
NO RATINGS
I say slowly pull out of China. Just a hunch http://bit.ly/IC4m9t

MI6
User Rank
Author
re: Texas Instruments plans to boost Chinese manufacturing
MI6   6/12/2013 6:33:33 PM
NO RATINGS
FAB Strong perhaps not. TI is a dinosaur in the world of manufacturing. Corporate leaderships/direction is haphazard at best as to what to do with its remaining manufacturing facilities. TI owns mostly Very Old Fabs, and spends Very little to update them. Of the two flagship 300mm Fabs they own, one is 14 years old running analog. The other, the Richardson Fab, is filled with used equipment from Qimonda which basically TI was forced to fill after keeping the shell in Richardson empty for years. A US manufacturing giant at one time it looks to be extinct in the future.

daleste
User Rank
Author
re: Texas Instruments plans to boost Chinese manufacturing
daleste   6/14/2013 3:11:08 AM
NO RATINGS
Yet another US company adding manufacturing capacity in another country. And we wonder why the US economy is so bad.

geekmaster
User Rank
Author
re: Texas Instruments plans to boost Chinese manufacturing
geekmaster   6/14/2013 6:50:47 PM
NO RATINGS
We have Non-US companies investing huge dollars in the US like Globalfoundries, Samsung (Qimonda in the past). Yes, there is Intel but I do not understand why there are not more US companies taking advantage of US state incentives like Globalfoundries and Samsung do. Beside of costs, are there better tax incentives or write-offs for going abroad?

daleste
User Rank
Author
re: Texas Instruments plans to boost Chinese manufacturing
daleste   6/15/2013 10:49:08 PM
NO RATINGS
I think the biggest advantage is lower payroll costs. They also want to get market share in those countries and having manufacturing there seems to help. On the downside, they have a lot of issues with exporting technology and having stable operations.

Most Recent Comments
michigan0
 
SteveHarris0
 
realjjj
 
SteveHarris0
 
SteveHarris0
 
VicVat
 
Les_Slater
 
SSDWEM
 
witeken
Most Recent Messages
9/25/2016
4:48:30 PM
michigan0 Sang Kim First, 28nm bulk is in volume manufacturing for several years by the major semiconductor companies but not 28nm FDSOI today yet. Why not? Simply because unlike 28nm bulk the LDD(Lightly Doped Drain) to minimize hot carrier generation can't be implemented in 28nm FDSOI. Furthermore, hot carrier reliability becomes worse with scaling, That is the major reason why 28nm FDSOI is not manufacturable today and will not be. Second, how can you suppress the leakage currents from such ultra short 7nm due to the short channel effects? How thin SOI thickness is required to prevent punch-through of un-dopped 7nm FDSOI? Possibly less than 4nm. Depositing such an ultra thin film less then 4nm filum uniformly and reliably over 12" wafers at the manufacturing line is extremely difficult or not even manufacturable. If not manufacturable, the 7nm FDSOI debate is over!Third, what happens when hot carriers are generated near the drain at normal operation of 7nm FDSOI? Electrons go to the positively biased drain with no harm but where the holes to go? The holes can't go to the substrate because of the thin BOX layer. Some holes may become trapped at the BOX layer causing Vt shift. However, the vast majority of holes drift through the the un-dopped SOI channel toward the N+Source,...

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed