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FPGA startups stare down giants and ghosts

7/27/2009 04:00 AM EDT
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contractorgal
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re: FPGA startups stare down giants and ghosts
contractorgal   6/22/2011 1:39:14 PM
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Having been employed at several start ups, none of which have stayed in business, companies failing to make it is the norm. Small business is risky as this article describes and there is no door protection to keep you in the business once you've entered. Lots of capital with often little return on investment and the eventual loss of more jobs. http://buildsitepro.com/home.asp

psommerfeld
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re: FPGA startups stare down giants and ghosts
psommerfeld   3/3/2010 4:10:49 AM
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That's a great chart! I imagine the auto sector looks something like this, with the Edsel's of the past, etc. I would love to know why the top 4 made it when the odds of collapse are so high in this sector. These companies must be underestimating the value of a bug-free, high-quality toolchain. The silicon doesn't mean anything if the toolchain doesn't fully support it.

wangyi
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re: FPGA startups stare down giants and ghosts
wangyi   7/29/2009 4:51:52 AM
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sst also want to get into FPGA market. eASIC seems better than any of the other fpga startup, they said they have 90nm chip to sell already. and 45nm is already prepared. whatever, the more player in FPGA, the healthier the fpga market.

MarcdUp
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re: FPGA startups stare down giants and ghosts
MarcdUp   7/28/2009 3:59:11 PM
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Don't forget ST Micro's attempt at FPGAs: http://eetimes.com/news/semi/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=161600613

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