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Seven things to fix in 2010. Join the conversation

What do you want fixed in 2010?
12/21/2009 04:00 PM EST
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Jimelectr
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re: Seven things to fix in 2010. Join the conversation
Jimelectr   4/28/2010 5:25:09 AM
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Americus, you're right on with the instant-on computer! The Apple II back in the late '70's/early '80's (that whole era is kind of a blur to me now!) had a boot ROM. Hopefully soon the price and capacity of solid state drives will come down and up, respectively, enough so that we can stop thrashing our hard drives every time we turn on our computers. The real problem is that the OS takes up so much disk space (and getting worse) that it's a losing battle. Why do we need faster and faster hardware? Slower and slower software, of course! And software is getting slower and slower faster than hardware is getting faster and faster! Same with disk space; we need bigger and bigger hard drives because software keeps taking up more and more space. And will Microsoft finally make Excel stop flushing the cut/paste buffer if I do anything between cutting or copying and pasting? I used Word for many years before ever trying Excel, and I found Excel so primitive! This is just one example of why. I keep waiting for Excel to have that bug fixed, but we're on 2007, and it's still there.

Susan Rambo
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re: Seven things to fix in 2010. Join the conversation
Susan Rambo   3/2/2010 4:33:35 PM
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Regarding Eagle Driver's comments about electric cars and jobs: Here's a good location for electric-car manufacturer to set up shop and preserve some jobs: the Nummi Plant in Fremont, Calif., is closing, with loss of at least 5,000 jobs just at the plant. It's a huge auto-manufacturing site, right next to Silicon Valley, being vacated by Toyota. It would be a great location for research and manufacturing of electric vehicles, battery technology, etc. (picture attached) I'll buy my next car there (I've already bought one from the plant), and there's a huge market right outside the door. http://articles.sfgate.com/keyword/nummi http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/transportation/jan-june10/nummi_02-09.html --S.Rambo Managing editor, ESD magazine

Eagle Driver
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re: Seven things to fix in 2010. Join the conversation
Eagle Driver   3/2/2010 12:14:56 AM
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We need to put people back to work building electric cars and solar panels. Some many things would take care of themselves if we used the bailout money to greatly enhance the solar and electric car industry so everyone could benefit, not just the rich. There are too many political roadblocks to using the technology that is already available. Advancing this technology could be thriving globally with the US R&D leading the way.

K1200LT Rider
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re: Seven things to fix in 2010. Join the conversation
K1200LT Rider   1/7/2010 4:38:21 PM
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For habitual tailgaters, a mandatory device that detects following distance and warns/annoys the driver as appropriate. Maybe it could also detect other aggressive, dangerous habits these same people tend to have. And, of course, it can't be disabled. The roads would be so much more pleasant, and I wouldn't feel so much like I'm putting myself in harm's way every time I get on my motorcycle. For some reason law enforcement is pretty much non-existent on I-95 around the Space Coast in Florida, so something else is desperately needed.

K1200LT Rider
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re: Seven things to fix in 2010. Join the conversation
K1200LT Rider   1/7/2010 4:26:01 PM
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We need a more universal way of programming on-board devices with an universally-available, generic JTAG cable (not special cables from each manufacturer) and a decent, open-source device programming app.

Zr2ee
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re: Seven things to fix in 2010. Join the conversation
Zr2ee   12/23/2009 11:10:36 AM
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how many times have you come across a entertainment system that you couldn't figure out or had to mess with for 30 minutes to work correctly, home entertainment devices need to become more seamless in their integration, tv's with built in 5.1 surround amps, devices smart enough to know that when you put in a dvd to switch to the right component and settings and when you hit guide you want to watch TV. The best feature about windows media center is its ability to bring multimedia together and make it seamless and easy to use once setup but its not widely enough supported by hardware vendors for out of the box setup. make entertainment devices more simple.

rick merritt
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re: Seven things to fix in 2010. Join the conversation
rick merritt   12/23/2009 4:27:18 AM
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Hey Americus, your #2 reminds me: 2010 is the year the industry needs to deliver the smartbook!

charlesbrown
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re: Seven things to fix in 2010. Join the conversation
charlesbrown   12/22/2009 7:30:40 PM
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1. Space program - Lets start mining asteroids. We could start some space missions to asteroids to look at their composition. We need raw materials in Space and asteroids offer lowest delta V and the biggest bang for our NASA $$$. 2. Robotics - We need to start looking at vision systems. We need to build robots that can understand their environments and manipulate that environment. If we could build robots that could understand their environment even as well as we have gotten speech and voice recognition to work, then we could end this recession on the spot. We would have whole new robot industries. 3. Nanotechnology - We keep hearing that it is the future, but I don't see much progress. For example the Nano - spring could revolutionize battery technology. There is a significant amount of power in a little Nano-spring for its size. If you have a lot of them and could use them to store energy. WOW. 4. Medical Technology - All the big $$$ are moving to the drug industry in the last few years. What about medical devices? Hearts, lungs, kidneys, body parts ...

Nirav Desai
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re: Seven things to fix in 2010. Join the conversation
Nirav Desai   12/22/2009 8:33:09 AM
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Here's a new user interface idea: I have tried using the iPhone and like many others find its touch screen to hard to control with my clumsy hands. I think the use of a MEMs gyro based stylus would revolutionize the way we use smartphones. Not only would it make data entry easier and faster, it could be used for a whole new class of gesture based data entry and interaction, similar to what we see in the Nintendo Wii. We could use it for a whole range of gesture specific functions like zoom in / out, click and double click, back and forward, write characters, etc. It could be powered through the cell phone and that will solve data transfer problems as well.

Americus
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re: Seven things to fix in 2010. Join the conversation
Americus   12/22/2009 6:28:03 AM
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Here's a couple of ideas: 1) Totally electric car, with 100 mile range, and swappable battery pack. 2) Instant on computer. When I push the power button, it should be ready to use immediately. 3)Solar power. It's big, round, yellow, and totally free, so use it. Let's put panels on every rooftop and across every desert. 4) Create world peace and feed the hungry. Come on, it's almost 2010 and we haven't done this yet?!?! :)

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