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Rare earth supply chain: Industry’s common cause

10/24/2010 10:36 AM EDT
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billp37
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re: Rare earth supply chain: Industry’s common cause
billp37   11/19/2010 1:56:30 AM
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From: bpayne37@comcast.net To: "R. Colin Johnson" Cc: "george leopold" "junko yoshida" "paul miller" "nicolas mokoff" Sent: Thursday, November 18, 2010 5:08:58 PM Subject: Re: I have been named: Kyoto Prize Fellow | Re: "Never overlook the oblivious." cautions Notos. Hello Mr Johnson, Congratulations. Neat EE Times article on rare earths. Rare earth supply chain: Industry's common cause. bill http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/eprishumard/howard/howard.htm#rare

Warren3
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re: Rare earth supply chain: Industry’s common cause
Warren3   10/26/2010 9:06:05 PM
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Yep. I appreciate what you've noted here Dave. If it is sufficiently and near-universally clear, or becomes so, that China is manipulating market dynamics and (by definition) WTO rules and responses are insufficient to deal with the problem then there does seem to be the [unpleasant but real] possibility of groups of countries teaming together to cooperate on a combined view and behavior of the group's best interests (a'la CoCom). This would seem to have the feel of a "trade war" though which, generally, is viewed as not being in anyone's best interest.

Bob Lacovara
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re: Rare earth supply chain: Industry’s common cause
Bob Lacovara   10/26/2010 8:08:52 PM
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It's hard to believe that this manipulation of the market is entirely due to China's desire to move up the production food chain. China knows where deposits lie: if 13% seem to be in the US and Australia, and another 14% in Russia, there's more than enough ore around to make for competition in the near future. Besides, rising prices will force the development of alternatives to rare earth metals and compounds where possible, and probably scuttle less important uses: slurries for polishing? Surely there are other ways to do that. Ditto for additives to diesel fuel. And car windshields? Well, wear sunglasses. Or build the sunglasses into the windshield.

wilber_xbox
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re: Rare earth supply chain: Industry’s common cause
wilber_xbox   10/26/2010 8:05:19 PM
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as the article says "China’s virtual monopoly on rare earth supplies doesn’t reflect a freakish overabundance of the stuff on and under Chinese soil, sources said; rather it is the result of decisions made in global markets", i do not think that Chinese are devil but are smart businessman and i am being neutral commentator here. Chinese can ramp up their production and export if they see any other country start mining and producing the minerals.

Dave.Dykstra
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re: Rare earth supply chain: Industry’s common cause
Dave.Dykstra   10/26/2010 4:27:27 PM
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This is another example of how all countries and companies function in their own interest, whether it be by increasing investment and production or by reducing it. Again the economics dictate the results. The real factor is whether countries and companies take the long view or the short view in doing so (and keep in mind that you have to get through the short term to get to the long term).

FH1
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re: Rare earth supply chain: Industry’s common cause
FH1   10/26/2010 8:48:18 AM
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You can't blame China for this ... rare earth are not rare, just no-one except China sees any value (i.e.profit) in them. Welcome (again) to the blindingly obvious 'dark' side of market forces !!!!! Foundry wafers are next .....

Warren3
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re: Rare earth supply chain: Industry’s common cause
Warren3   10/26/2010 3:54:54 AM
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Sounds like the Chinese government. ------------- [Just kidding around]

QWESTER
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re: Rare earth supply chain: Industry’s common cause
QWESTER   10/26/2010 3:48:22 AM
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China is a violent military dictatorship with no conscience or ethical constraints. Free traders smile as they ride China's tiger. They return from the ride with the traders inside and the smile on the face of the tiger. We have lost to China the talented communities that won WWII. We are being bled like African cattle, a little every day til we ar thin and weak economically, addicted to low priced chinese imports with coaster wagons to carry our inflated currency to the store. China will not change except in their own interest.

docdivakar
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re: Rare earth supply chain: Industry’s common cause
docdivakar   10/25/2010 11:04:17 PM
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@R.ColinJohnson: the article reads like story a line for a hollywood hit, with the maneuvering the Chinese businesses attempted in buying Molycorp and its eventual owner Unocal; but bidding by more a half-billion over Chevron's bid is a dead give away so I wonder if that was really the intent of the Chinese business involved in the acquisition bid. Well, the steps for risk mitigation are quite clear: get Molycorp's Mountain Pass mine operating again to build up rare earth metal reserves while US & western markets can continue to source from China. This can also act as a guard against unwarranted price increases. Longer term, there is no alternative to China's reserves of rare earth's, they just happen to have it! Geopolitical machinations can be a tough act to fathom. I too haven't heard anything on how the OEM's and OSAT's are planning to dealt with this critical supply problem. Dr. MP Divakar

apummer945
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re: Rare earth supply chain: Industry’s common cause
apummer945   10/25/2010 9:50:23 PM
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the US used to have substantial "Rare Earth" production not to long time ego, but it was more expensive than to buy from China therefore it was dismantled, see how fare do you get with greed.. and stupidity get banished sooner or later in that case sooner

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