Breaking News
News & Analysis

LG plays the health card to win a 3-D TV battle

1/6/2011 04:07 PM EST
11 comments
NO RATINGS
Page 1 / 3 Next >
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
elctrnx_lyf
User Rank
Manager
re: LG plays the health card to win a 3-D TV battle
elctrnx_lyf   1/12/2011 2:49:14 PM
NO RATINGS
I think the 3D is definitely poised for a big growth in the future. Like what we have seen in the 2D LCD display technologies like TN to IPS we will see much better performaing technologies will be available. I will wait till the technology actually matures before buying one 3D TV.

selinz
User Rank
CEO
re: LG plays the health card to win a 3-D TV battle
selinz   1/11/2011 12:30:20 AM
NO RATINGS
With ESPN now broadcasting a 3D channel full-time, I'd be likely to buy a 3d version if it is close in price to the non-3d, even if it's an off brand (which I consider LG, although they are big).

_hm
User Rank
CEO
re: LG plays the health card to win a 3-D TV battle
_hm   1/8/2011 4:04:57 AM
NO RATINGS
I had a chance to experience the 3D technology at local Best Buy store. However, with 3D glasses, I found large screen TV image looks smaller. Is this due to optics or some other reason? Or does it happen to me only?

kkersey
User Rank
Rookie
re: LG plays the health card to win a 3-D TV battle
kkersey   1/7/2011 5:09:56 PM
NO RATINGS
Just got back from CES - I got to view many competitor's 3D displays. I went in with an open mind, and came out believing that LG's passive approach is head-and-shoulder's the best (I have no affiliation with them). The active glasses of others give weird "shimmery" effects, and subliminally "feel" wrong (probably the rapid lens switching causing subconscious nerve confusion). Some glasses-free displays looked OK, but only at ONE distance. LG's looked great at any distance. Kudos, LG. Also, Fuji's 3D snapshot camera (the W3) was very well done. The camera had a lenticular (glasses-free) 3D viewfinder LCD and was easily toggled between 2D and 3D. Overall, I'm still unclear whether 3D displays add enough value to become mainstream - but I came away with more postive feelings about it (with LG's approach) than before.

yalanand
User Rank
Rookie
re: LG plays the health card to win a 3-D TV battle
yalanand   1/7/2011 4:47:34 PM
NO RATINGS
Hey nice analogy...I hope you are right in this case. Lets hope we will find some innovative way such that 3DTV health hazards doesnt kill the growing 3DTV industry.

Robotics Developer
User Rank
Rookie
re: LG plays the health card to win a 3-D TV battle
Robotics Developer   1/7/2011 3:31:50 PM
NO RATINGS
While I find the news about competing technologies interesting, I am still not inclined to invest in an expensive / emerging system. Is there enough 3D source to make the cost worthwhile? I am not a doctor but it would seem to me that the flicker would stress the user's eyes, I know from working in offices with fluorescent lights that my eyes are often tired at the end of the day. In natural sunlight (as it at home with a window) I do not have the same tired eye syndrome. So, I will wait for the dust to settle on 3D and then maybe consider it for the home if the movie / TV content is there.

ost0
User Rank
CEO
re: LG plays the health card to win a 3-D TV battle
ost0   1/7/2011 8:04:21 AM
NO RATINGS
The technology is not the only problem. The content needs to work as intended as well. I know that a major computer graphic cards manufacturer - when outputting active stereo - does not render left and following right frame at the same "space-time". They actually move stuff around a frame-period before rendering the next eye. Of course the brain will get stressed when things are moving. The faster movement, the more stress. And also, interference with room lighting has a big impact on stress. Fluorecent lamps are not kind to shutter glasses. I have been working with stereoscopic displays for more than 10 years now and very few systems have control of the important details. And I don't trust any of the old research material, cause I don't know if the details were in place when they did it.

Etmax
User Rank
Rookie
re: LG plays the health card to win a 3-D TV battle
Etmax   1/7/2011 2:19:04 AM
NO RATINGS
I stand corrected on fragmentation at the source, thanks for explaining that. Interestingly if the pixels alternate their content you have only half the horizontal resolution. I wonder why LG didn't have their filter separate horizontally like the source?? Any ideas?

Andrew.Green
User Rank
Rookie
re: LG plays the health card to win a 3-D TV battle
Andrew.Green   1/7/2011 1:54:44 AM
NO RATINGS
The 3D market isn't fragmenting. 3D display technology is separate from 3D content distribution formats. The 3D content formats were just recently agreed upon in 2010. The 3D displays will convert the 3D content in order to display it with the technology the display uses. As an example Mitsubishi TVs have had 3D support for years well before 3D formats were standardized. These TVs use a checkerboard pattern where all odd pixels are for the left eye and even pixels are for the right eye (shutter glasses still required). Mitsubishi provides a box that converts the latest 3D content to the checkerboard format so that their older TVs can display the latest 3D content. Likewise FPR, RZD, and even as-yet-uncreated 3D display technologies will be able to convert the standard content formats to their proprietary display formats.

MSimon0
User Rank
Rookie
re: LG plays the health card to win a 3-D TV battle
MSimon0   1/7/2011 1:08:49 AM
NO RATINGS
Edison proved AC electricity was no good. How? He designed the electric chair to prove how dangerous AC was. And the Westinghouse/Tesla patents on 3 phase electricity retarded the market until the patents ran out. These technology wars are nothing new.

Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Flash Poll
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
Join our online Radio Show on Friday 11th July starting at 2:00pm Eastern, when EETimes editor of all things fun and interesting, Max Maxfield, and embedded systems expert, Jack Ganssle, will debate as to just what is, and is not, and embedded system.
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Top Comments of the Week