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Researchers develop 'electronic skin' for structural faults

6/29/2011 02:13 PM EDT
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DrQuine
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re: Researchers develop 'electronic skin' for structural faults
DrQuine   7/5/2011 11:36:50 PM
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(apologies to Sanjib.Acharya who already suggested fuselage monitoring - on first read I only noticed the "moving" components)

DrQuine
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re: Researchers develop 'electronic skin' for structural faults
DrQuine   7/5/2011 11:32:33 PM
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This sounds like it could also be usefully applied to the fuselage of an airplane. Continuous reporting of physical integrity could replace the current labor intensive process of scheduled preventative maintenance inspections of the body for cracks and impending ruptures.

yalanand
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re: Researchers develop 'electronic skin' for structural faults
yalanand   7/4/2011 9:45:01 AM
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Any reason why it can't be applied to rotating objects ? Can't we make this skin flexbile and transmit wireless signals to base station ?

nicolas.mokhoff
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re: Researchers develop 'electronic skin' for structural faults
nicolas.mokhoff   6/30/2011 6:42:17 PM
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vipin: more details about this research has been published in papers appearing in Structural Control Health Monitoring (December 2010) and the Journal of Materials Chemistry (April 2011). In addition, you might want to contact researcher Laflamme at laflamme@alum.mit.edu.

vipin_tyagi
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re: Researchers develop 'electronic skin' for structural faults
vipin_tyagi   6/30/2011 4:07:25 PM
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Can this yechnolgy be used in geosynthetic systems using polymeric products?

wilber_xbox
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re: Researchers develop 'electronic skin' for structural faults
wilber_xbox   6/30/2011 4:05:37 PM
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I find this article highly exciting not because of the hightech nature of the research but because of the simplicity. How more simple can it get to find a stain in a building. For sure we should be able to use this technique to save our crumbling infrastructure and fix it before its too late.

Sanjib.A
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re: Researchers develop 'electronic skin' for structural faults
Sanjib.A   6/30/2011 2:44:32 AM
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Ok. Thank you for the information!

nicolas.mokhoff
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re: Researchers develop 'electronic skin' for structural faults
nicolas.mokhoff   6/29/2011 5:51:52 PM
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I believe this research is for stationary objects. I don't see that it could not be applied to airplane wings. Research at Stanford University seem to be on that course: http://news.discovery.com/tech/spider-web-sensors.html

Sanjib.A
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re: Researchers develop 'electronic skin' for structural faults
Sanjib.A   6/29/2011 4:24:33 PM
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Can this technology be used for the moving machinery parts such as turbine blades, fuselage of a aero plane etc? Or are the meant for the stationary objects? Why it occured to me, because, a few days back I was watching a program related to the air accident investigation. In 2002, a China Airline flight 611 broke down mid-air shortly after take-off and the investigation revealed that the accident occurred due to an undiscovered crack in the fuselage. This kind of issues could be avoided using this technology.

nicolas.mokhoff
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re: Researchers develop 'electronic skin' for structural faults
nicolas.mokhoff   6/29/2011 3:54:12 PM
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Does this research sound like it can be applied practically to save our aging transportation infrastructure?

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