Breaking News
News & Analysis

Unmanned vehicles push wireless, but lack in multicore

9/30/2011 05:24 PM EDT
8 comments
NO RATINGS
More Related Links
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Robotics Developer
User Rank
Rookie
re: Unmanned vehicles push wireless, but lack in multicore
Robotics Developer   10/3/2011 5:31:08 PM
NO RATINGS
I was surprised by the lack of multi-core processors in the drones. I could see great advances possible with the board/power savings of dual core chip sets, especially if coupled with some front end FPGAs. There is indeed a lot of activity currently in the hobby and college arenas with both flight and remote semi-autonomous robotic efforts. Truly sensors are where it is at for robotic systems and lower cost higher performing chips will drive these machines to unheard of capabilities sooner rather than later. Consider the explosion in Kinect based robotic systems as a prime example. How many YouTube videos are there with autonomous navigation using Kinects? It is just the beginning..

GREAT-Terry
User Rank
CEO
re: Unmanned vehicles push wireless, but lack in multicore
GREAT-Terry   10/3/2011 6:27:09 AM
NO RATINGS
Good news to sensor guys! All these drones should be surrounded by sensors of different kinds. It may also help pushing the whole commercial market!

agk
User Rank
Rookie
re: Unmanned vehicles push wireless, but lack in multicore
agk   10/2/2011 8:01:45 AM
NO RATINGS
Here the important aspect is the sensors.It is better to have independant controllers processing the sensor signals and all the sensor processors outputs go to the final central processor. This way the artificial inelligence performs faster and a multicore or non multicore is not impotant.

nicolas.mokhoff
User Rank
Rookie
re: Unmanned vehicles push wireless, but lack in multicore
nicolas.mokhoff   10/1/2011 4:54:04 PM
NO RATINGS
The article came from the mil/aero special issue, which concentrated on military developments of UAVs (http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/cmp/eetimes_military_20110921/#/1). I'm sure the subject can be expanded into the commercial realm and even into hobbyists' interests. To than end I welcome tech trend tidbits as well as suggestions for our coverage in these areas. If the matter warrants for EEs to know about the technologies, we will certainly pursue. You can email me at nicolas.mokhoff@ubm.com.

msakms
User Rank
Rookie
re: Unmanned vehicles push wireless, but lack in multicore
msakms   10/1/2011 3:23:54 PM
NO RATINGS
EXACTLY, that's one thing many haven't noticed.

KB3001
User Rank
CEO
re: Unmanned vehicles push wireless, but lack in multicore
KB3001   10/1/2011 12:30:51 PM
NO RATINGS
Good news all round. The military folks can keep the edge on the sensors side, while everybody can benefit from robust standard APIs for sensor networks with multiple useful applications e.g. civilian rescue missions, energy harvesting, exploration of harsh environments, to name but few.

ReneCardenas
User Rank
Rookie
re: Unmanned vehicles push wireless, but lack in multicore
ReneCardenas   10/1/2011 4:44:16 AM
NO RATINGS
This is so awesome in so many ways for hobbiest and military applications in the high-end, despite the dark side that showed up recently. This is a great medium to accelerate military and space development into consumer applications. Does anyone have any good recommendations of kit suppliers?

LarryM99
User Rank
CEO
re: Unmanned vehicles push wireless, but lack in multicore
LarryM99   9/30/2011 9:34:44 PM
NO RATINGS
The concentration here is on military progress, but universities and home hobbyists are also making incredible progress in UAV's. They are using standard platforms much more readily than the defense contractors do and are seeing the progress that results. Larry M.

Top Comments of the Week
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
"All the King's horses and all the KIng's men gave up on Humpty, so they handed the problem off to Engineering."
5 comments
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
David Patterson, known for his pioneering research that led to RAID, clusters and more, is part of a team at UC Berkeley that recently made its RISC-V processor architecture an open source hardware offering. We talk with Patterson and one of his colleagues behind the effort about the opportunities they see, what new kinds of designs they hope to enable and what it means for today’s commercial processor giants such as Intel, ARM and Imagination Technologies.
Flash Poll