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The human element: ahead of his time

1/4/2012 09:10 PM EST
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krisi
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re: The human element: ahead of his time
krisi   1/6/2012 4:50:07 PM
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thank you @phoenixdave, this is very useful comment, I didn't realize this technology is already used in emergency situations...will FDA would need to approve the new iPhone/iPad based technology? if not what is stopping the inventor of rolling out millions of units? I am very healthy but would buy one immediately just in case...Kris

phoenixdave
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re: The human element: ahead of his time
phoenixdave   1/6/2012 3:53:54 PM
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Emergency defibrillators that are present in most public location are made so that even those untrained in their usage can provide emergency care. The detectors are applied based upon pictured instructions and the ECG reading is used to determine if a shock is necessary. I would think that a similar "user-friendly" interface could be used in this iPad/iPhone application and provide accurate results.

rick merritt
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re: The human element: ahead of his time
rick merritt   1/6/2012 2:38:46 PM
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Wonderful story!

krisi
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re: The human element: ahead of his time
krisi   1/5/2012 10:48:06 PM
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thank you Bert and Larry, I agree computer will be better than a person to read the results eventually (it will take time though, todays MRI and CT scan are read still by doctors not software)...and yes you would digitized the results before the transmission the problem I was refering to is the actual measurement, depending on how you apply electrodes and what is your environment you will get different results, I know that first hand, I deal with bio-med instrumentation frequently...I doubt that do it yourself test would be reliable but could see it as a first stage screening tool...Kris

Bert22306
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re: The human element: ahead of his time
Bert22306   1/5/2012 10:27:58 PM
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In principle, if a lab tech can read the sensor results, a computer can be programmed to do the same. And eventually, over several iterations of the technology, the computer diagnosis becomes more accurate and consistent. Pretty much as it always has been.

Larry M
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re: The human element: ahead of his time
Larry M   1/5/2012 10:18:53 PM
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Kris, Surely you would condition (amplify, filter) the signal before transmission. Probably you would digitize it, too.

krisi
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re: The human element: ahead of his time
krisi   1/5/2012 7:09:56 PM
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I will be a little sceptical about remote ECG, although I applaud the idea in general...the signal levels are very small and easily affected by noise, without proper training it could easily lead to mis-diagnosis...but ultrasound with iPAD/iPhone should work just fine, I believe many companies are working on that...Kris

Bert22306
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re: The human element: ahead of his time
Bert22306   1/5/2012 2:22:08 AM
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Wow. I just posted something along these lines, on the opinion column about manufacturing. This is a great way to go, for health care. Not just for remote ECGs, of course. The same model can be used for any number of lab tests, which now involve a lot of manual labor and visits to the doctor's office. Upload results to the medical practice server(s), then only make doctor's appointments when required.

_hm
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re: The human element: ahead of his time
_hm   1/5/2012 1:56:42 AM
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Great idea and very interesting story. My best wishes to Albert. Actually, we were thinking of having - ultrasound device with tablet like iPAD.

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