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Future of SSL LED lighting is not dim, but it’s flickering

3/28/2012 00:33 AM EDT
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daleste
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CEO
re: Future of SSL LED lighting is not dim, but it’s flickering
daleste   3/28/2012 3:39:51 AM
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Things like this should only be driven by the market. If you make a better mouse trap, the world will beat a path to your door. As soon as it is more economical for me to buy SSL, I will switch. Until then, you know who will be getting my hard earned dollars. For the government to step in and mandate the change is just more of our liberties evaporating.

LEDAgree
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re: Future of SSL LED lighting is not dim, but it’s flickering
LEDAgree   3/28/2012 4:49:11 AM
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The market change to SSL lighting is, contrary to public and misinformed opinion, not government mandated on a national level, but subscribed to a global convention. The incandescent light bulb is not banned, but at the end of it's production in countries around the world. When countries such as China can make the change to SSL or the less expensive CFL technology due to the huge advantages for energy and the dependence on non-renewable energy, they now set the example while we, the US believe everything is big government and an infringement of our rights. We live in a global world. Turn on your computer and look around sometime.

elctrnx_lyf
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Manager
re: Future of SSL LED lighting is not dim, but it’s flickering
elctrnx_lyf   3/28/2012 5:37:28 AM
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I think SSL will be the future considering the fact that it offers many advantages like power saving and longer term reliability. But at the same the infrastructure around the power generation and distribution also shall be improved.

subman
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re: Future of SSL LED lighting is not dim, but it’s flickering
subman   3/28/2012 6:22:32 AM
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LEDAgree, my computer is on, as is the case for anyone who is reading this (not a very perceptive suggestion, by the way!). What global world should we join? One of Europe, where econonies are stifled under the growing beaucratic state? One of China, where freedom is a concept that may develop in the future? I choose neither, and I hope many more do the same in November.

subman
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Rookie
re: Future of SSL LED lighting is not dim, but it’s flickering
subman   3/28/2012 6:33:16 AM
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In the US, incandescent bulbs are being phased out by law by wattage (I'd call that "banned") in the US. 100W was phased out in CA last year, and is phasing out in the rest of the US this year per congressional mandate. Next year comes 75W, and so on (all part of the same bill, already passed). Not sure what sort of linguistic contortion LEDAgree is attempting...technically the bulb itself is not banned, just the sale of it. Stores can still sell their stock, so it will take several months to see the effect. If you want to make your own bulbs, go ahead, I think that is legal. You just can't sell them or buy them. Ok, you're right, not banned. The wording in the legislation is a little obscure for most people - it sets lumens/watt minimums rather than "banning" incandescent, but the effect is the same. You won't be able to buy 100W, 75W, etc. incandenscent bulbs. And yes, the lower wattages are not banned for now. How many 40W bulbs do you have in your household lighting? You've got a few years left before those no longer meet the lumens/watt requirements in the passed legislation. Enjoy the dim light, at least it doesn't flicker. I personally like that I can screw in a bulb, not have any flicker, and dim it with a simple, inexpensive, old-fashioned, voltage-varying slider switch. I am baffled at why Michelle Bachman is pillorized for supporting the freedom to buy a darn light bulb. Seems even more bizarre to me that congress acted to ban light bulbs.

subman
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Rookie
re: Future of SSL LED lighting is not dim, but it’s flickering
subman   3/28/2012 6:33:33 AM
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The banning of the 100W and 75W light bulb has been done without fanfare, because those who support it are hoping the majority of the country simply doesn't notice. I suggest you write your congressman, and respond vociferously to silly, distorted posts that characterize banning light bulbs as a failure to follow the great example of China. When did it become seditious to sell 100W light bulbs in the US? Last year in CA, Oct 2012 in the US (after a short reprieve pushed through by Bachman's evil cohorts) in the rest of the country. Google it. Don't buy into the semantic distortions, or the attempts to characterize supporters of economic freedom as Luddites. The real Luddites are those who don't believe in letting AS's invisible hand do its work. Turn off your computer for a bit and read an economics book.LEDAgree, my computer is on, as is the case for anyone who is reading this (not a very perceptive suggestion, by the way!). What global world should we join? One of Europe, where econonies are stifled under the growing beaucratic state? One of China, where freedom is a concept that may develop in the future? I choose neither, and I hope many more do the same in November.

agk
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Rookie
re: Future of SSL LED lighting is not dim, but it’s flickering
agk   3/28/2012 11:11:00 AM
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The author has discussed about the effects of flicker coming out of the light bulbs. It is very true. I compared the 4 ft tube light with inductive ballast and with electronic ballast. I found there is a great comfort my eyes felt with electronic ballast generally this works around 40 kHz. Because the light has high frequency flicker which is not detected by the eyes. The inductive ballast works at line frequency 50 or 60 hZ give us visible flicker. A LED light generally works on PWM principle at a higher frequency than the line frequency and so the flicker problem is minimum or not visible at all.

sierra tango
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Rookie
re: Future of SSL LED lighting is not dim, but it’s flickering
sierra tango   3/28/2012 5:47:32 PM
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change is inevitable....growth optional..

mike.seiler
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Rookie
re: Future of SSL LED lighting is not dim, but it’s flickering
mike.seiler   3/28/2012 6:32:16 PM
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@agk I agree completely. I had never heard or thought of led flicker being an issue at the frequency they operate at. Why are they wasting time on this. Also why be overly concerned about making leds fit traditional fittings. Light fittings, not just the bulbs that fit them have limited lifetimes as well. Many people update them when they paint a room and a lot of fittings actually fail from the heat of incandescents. If you can buy a whole fitting with led lamp for the price of an led bulb that fits bc or edison screw fittings. I know I'd rather have a whole fitting. With the proliferation of fluroscent fitting formats in the past 20 years and add to that the halogen formats etc I wonder whether it is more of importance to build an led bulb for performance and reliability than be concerned about backward compatability. You only need to look at handheld torches to see nobody was concerned about throwing out their old incandescent torches for the bright new led torches available.

Robotics Developer
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Rookie
re: Future of SSL LED lighting is not dim, but it’s flickering
Robotics Developer   3/28/2012 6:44:11 PM
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I am much less concerned with the flickering as I am with the short life and high costs for the LEDs. The day to day annoying issue that I have run into with a number of the LED lights is the high frequency whine that the power conversion circuit generates. This is really a background but hard to ignore noise. The dimming issue is a bother but never bulbs can be dimmed (not sure how they are doing it, I don't own any). I went out and bought a 4 pack of 100W good old fashioned light bulbs just to have them. I resent the nanny state regulating things that directly impact me and wish the government would allow the free market to drive innovation and improvements not silly laws.

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