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NEC, Tohoku University make CAM-on-MRAM progress

6/13/2011 08:26 AM EDT
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resistion
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re: NEC, Tohoku University make CAM-on-MRAM progress
resistion   6/16/2011 1:19:44 AM
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The magnetic moment is still stored on atoms, which could be disturbed thermally. What is the temperature range of operation?

Peter Clarke
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re: NEC, Tohoku University make CAM-on-MRAM progress
Peter Clarke   6/14/2011 12:13:54 PM
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content addressable memories are used in certain very high speed searching applications. More likely to be used in the network for routing information than in the server. The high-speed (the whole of the CAM can be searched for matches in one hit) come at a cost that each memory cell requires a comparison circuit.....so the cell size is many transistors compared with 1 or 4 or 6 for DRAM or SRAM, but Tohoku-NEC are cutting that down and saving standby power with developments like those described above.

LarryM99
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re: NEC, Tohoku University make CAM-on-MRAM progress
LarryM99   6/13/2011 10:36:12 PM
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I've heard of CAM in the context of forms of artificial intelligence / pattern recognition. Is that what they are going for here? It doesn't seem so from the text of this article. Am I missing something here? Larry M.

goafrit
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re: NEC, Tohoku University make CAM-on-MRAM progress
goafrit   6/13/2011 6:36:45 PM
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I never know people present top ideas in this event: Symposia on VLSI Circuits and Technologies. Very fascinating then.

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