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Intel launches solid-state drive

12/30/2010 02:21 PM EST
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Ramanathan.G
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re: Intel launches solid-state drive
Ramanathan.G   7/17/2011 4:37:47 AM
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Sounds interesting. HDD has serious reliability issue due to the mechanical parts.

luizsalomon
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re: Intel launches solid-state drive
luizsalomon   1/6/2011 4:55:38 PM
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Come on!!! Most of us here are engineers and we now that SSD can hold a certain amount of data, for long enough. The only problem is that it can't cycle - erases and writes. That's why you put an OS into the SSD and have all the swaps, temps, virtual, backups and everything that cycles a lot, on a magnetic thing. That's it. Talking about capacity, this issue should be brought back in another 5 years. I have a hard drive that's 5 years old and has only 20GB. Moore's Law!!!! Now, go back to work!

sharps_eng
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re: Intel launches solid-state drive
sharps_eng   1/6/2011 10:52:31 AM
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@SEofLC - now if that doesn't highlight the need for a handy international weight reference for comparison... I'd say 10gm is nearly a third of an ounce... 150 drips of water... can anyone think of a handy electronics-based object to use as a an internationally available weight reference, other than the gramme itself? Luckily I know the phrase 'nickelled and dimed to death' but can your car 'turn on a sixpence'?

SEofLC
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re: Intel launches solid-state drive
SEofLC   1/5/2011 8:35:42 PM
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Nevermind... 4 dimes or 2 nickles = 9 grams.

SEofLC
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re: Intel launches solid-state drive
SEofLC   1/5/2011 8:15:56 PM
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10 grams? Really? Or did someone loose a significant digit?

ReneCardenas
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re: Intel launches solid-state drive
ReneCardenas   1/5/2011 1:25:07 AM
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I have over a dozen laptops and a handful of desktops. Yes, most laptops don't age well, starting with battery wear, then hard drive crashes, panel bad pixels and so on. My estimate that every 3 to 5 years most users replace their main computer has been accurate. However, with the masses moving to super phones this issue is going to be diluted some more. Boot time was a concern in early systems due to self test and other legacy starting enumeration. However, with portable devices been less flexible those issues will fade to a minimum and little relevance when comparing netbooks vs. super tablets. IMHO.

krisi
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re: Intel launches solid-state drive
krisi   1/4/2011 4:57:55 PM
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Baolt: I agree. Most people I know use laptop for less than 5 years. Personally I get a new one once every two years. Unless you are vigilant about what software you are installing on your machine no PC will be effectively useful after 5/10 years. The replacement cost will be very low and the cost of making the old machine work too high...Kris

pixies
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re: Intel launches solid-state drive
pixies   1/4/2011 4:27:03 PM
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I don't think magnetic media last over archeological time especially. It has been imaged with MFM that domain walls migrate even at room temperature. Anyway, how long a magnetic drive last is inconsequential since the electronic parts, the mechanical parts, and control software will not be able to last a 100 year anyway. I have been contemplating this question recently, the only sure way to pass your photos to the grandchildren is still to print them out then put them in a fireproof box.

Baolt
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re: Intel launches solid-state drive
Baolt   1/4/2011 12:30:33 AM
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Who would use a laptop/Pad more than 5 years or even 10 years? If id keep my first toshiba running i guess id be really really patient guy or not? :) SSDs are digital based, logic based structures, of course have problem of loosing some data (bits) by time, but with great respond speed, would let OS to boot up in a glance. If someone would like to store data, wait up cloud is almost here, or go for Blu-rays they also offer much reliable storage.

selinz
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re: Intel launches solid-state drive
selinz   1/3/2011 7:28:49 PM
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It's hard for me to imagine paying that much of an overhead for a flash drive. It seems as though my computers are pleny fast enough for pretty much anything I do, particularly if you got your DRAM loaded up to 8 or 16 gigs.

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