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Intel's Sandy Bridge CPU gets GPU support

1/3/2011 02:06 PM EST
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pjduncan
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re: Intel's Sandy Bridge CPU gets GPU support
pjduncan   1/5/2011 3:20:49 AM
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Sony had/has laptops that had a switch to change between an Intel built-in GPU (longer battery life) vs a high performance discrete GPU (ability to play serious games). Only problem... you had to reboot after throwing the switch. This software is solving that problem.

anon7584804
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re: Intel's Sandy Bridge CPU gets GPU support
anon7584804   1/4/2011 2:50:20 AM
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the Sandy Bridge is on par with the entry to mid-segment of External graphics. HD video / 3-D gaming will be easy with Sandy Bridge with out any system crash/hang.

Sanborn84
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re: Intel's Sandy Bridge CPU gets GPU support
Sanborn84   1/3/2011 6:20:29 PM
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Well Kinnar, by design the Sandybridge architecture alone eliminates the need for external GPUs because the GPU is literally integrated into the CPU. On-board motherboard chipsets have existed since Y2K but their performance is absolutely dreadful and the very reason why my wife's laptop from 2007 chokes on HD video. This is me making assumptions, but I thought one of the original selling points of the Sandy Bridge was exactly what this Lucidlogix chip is promising to do? Is this Lucid chipset actually needed with modern CPU and GPU low-power modes?

Kinnar
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re: Intel's Sandy Bridge CPU gets GPU support
Kinnar   1/3/2011 6:01:53 PM
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Graphics Virtualization is a very great development, this might totally eliminate the need of GPU for a work PC as the processing power is surely higher for regular office work on this architecture.

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