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Recovery remains uncertain but China is key, says survey

11/18/2009 12:00 PM EST
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nexogen
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re: Recovery remains uncertain but China is key, says survey
nexogen   11/19/2009 7:08:04 AM
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You cannot have technological unemployment in a money based system. The crisis will not go away unless you accept this and demand a moneyless system, or Resource Based Economy as some call it. You know how fast automation technologies replace human labor, and that's the final proof our current system is out of date. Planned obsolecence and deliberate product inefficiency is not a sane way to deal with this as it destroys the environment. There are 1 billion people starving in the world yet we have enough food to feed twice the entire population. I dare you think more about this, research it, look up the work of the Jacque Fresco, before it's too late.

Chee Choy
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re: Recovery remains uncertain but China is key, says survey
Chee Choy   11/19/2009 2:57:31 AM
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China is definitely a vibrant marketplace st this time, but one thing, China import very little from other countries, only raw materials are their major importing items with some high end quality products to meet their riches group, also high tech products China do not produce. Other than that I seen very little impact China could benefit others rather do not worsen the world econcmy is good enough.

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