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Fuel vaporization could boost gas mileage, cut emissions

1/26/2009 10:00 PM EST
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broccoli
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re: Fuel vaporization could boost gas mileage, cut emissions
broccoli   1/27/2009 4:32:06 PM
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If this company claims to have independent test performed that confirm their claims of 30% fuel savings with no loss of horsepower, they need to publish those tests on their website (those tests docments are conspicuously absent on the company's website.) In other words, it's time to put up or shut up.

Mayor McCheese
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re: Fuel vaporization could boost gas mileage, cut emissions
Mayor McCheese   1/27/2009 5:27:43 PM
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A quote from the test company's research director that conducted the test isn't enough for you? Why would you need to see such test documentation? Reading both the companies web site, this article, and the other posted on their news page (which it looks like you failed to do) would indicate that they have all ready "put up". Who are you to say what a company need to put on their web site? I didn't know there was an Internet Police, perhaps you have a badge number? So, Mr. Broccoli, where is your fuel saving device, patents and independent test result? I see you failed to post them.

sdb
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re: Fuel vaporization could boost gas mileage, cut emissions
sdb   1/27/2009 7:46:45 PM
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This does sound on the edge of too-good-to-be-true (and you know what your mother said about things that sounded too good to be true) so I am going to follow up in 6 months -- if the numbers are true this will have made a big splash by then -- it not, their web page will remain static. I will also try to determine whether they are using this annoucement to bring in investors.

vsrosa
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re: Fuel vaporization could boost gas mileage, cut emissions
vsrosa   1/28/2009 8:54:16 AM
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when you say "The same fuel mixture enters the engine, but because hotter air occupies more space and provides more power, it enables a simultaneous savings in fuel economy and lower emissions." you are contradictating yourself. If the air is hotter and occupies more space, then you have less mixture inside the cylinder (a constant volume unit) and you should have less maximum power output from the engine. If your engine is a large one, you can get savings because you also reduce the drag associated to the vacuum in the intake. I'm not a engine expert, but I think the same work could be done with variable intake valve timing.

anon9303122
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re: Fuel vaporization could boost gas mileage, cut emissions
anon9303122   1/28/2009 3:29:49 PM
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Oh, no. Not another one. Doesn't anyone think that if it was that easy to improve mileage and cut emissions, that car manufacturers with their millions in research dollars would have done this twenty years ago? This inevitably will turn out to provide little to no improvement in either fuel economy or emissions except by the fuel savings gained by lightening the wallet of the consumer.

dvandit
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re: Fuel vaporization could boost gas mileage, cut emissions
dvandit   1/28/2009 5:23:26 PM
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Maybe the people who currently do aftermarket re-programming, (chipping) of ECUs for more HP and torque can do a higher fuel economy version of their software...

broccoli
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re: Fuel vaporization could boost gas mileage, cut emissions
broccoli   1/29/2009 3:20:23 AM
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To answer why I think test documents should be made available: 1) If the test data proves out the inventor's claims, it would only be to the inventor's benefit to make the test documents available. 2)There's huge precedent for supposed fuel-saving gizmos that just somehow never pan out. 3)Modern engines already burn fuel 98-99% completelly, so there just isn't any room for this claim of 30% improvement in mileage of a car retrofitted with this vaporization system. See this link for more explanation of this point: http://www.fuelsaving.info/unburnt_fuel.htm So since the inventor's claims don't make any freakin' sense, I think it pretty reasonable to ask for the test data.

Zr2ee
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re: Fuel vaporization could boost gas mileage, cut emissions
Zr2ee   2/2/2009 8:58:01 AM
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between the hydrogen generators, fuel catalysts and other things that never seems to make it to the big market its easy to be a skeptic, but you never know until you try it. however i am curious how they can claim a more powerful combustion by displacing gas with hot air, everything i've learned about cars says that cold air and a leaner mixture creates more power...but warmer air improves milage since less fuel is needed to keep the air fuel ratio consistant im also curious about how they could control their "auto ignition" without causing premature detonation

Ron_Sparky
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re: Fuel vaporization could boost gas mileage, cut emissions
Ron_Sparky   2/11/2009 6:17:14 PM
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Heating the air to force the evaporation of the fuel may give better mileage, it will also cause a serious problem with pre-ignition and detonation in the cylinders. When the piston compresses the air/fuel mixture, it will cause it to heat up (basic physics). If it is pre-heated "to near the point of spontaneous combustion" the added heating of compression will cause pre-ignition which will cause significant damage to the engine. Then there is the issue of getting the same amount of power out of the engine. By preheating, the mixture density is lower giving a lower combustion pressure. The result is a lower amount of power from the air/fuel mixture. The F150 in the article will have a very hard time trying to pull a trailer with this type of fuel system feeding it. The full amount of power of a carbureted or fuel injected engine will be impossible to achieve with this system.

Paul_A/V
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re: Fuel vaporization could boost gas mileage, cut emissions
Paul_A/V   3/12/2009 1:13:14 PM
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"Work to Ride", GM had an experimental intake manifold and carburetor in the early 1950s. It somehow got into a production 1951 Buick Roadmaster that reached a dealer in Pittsburgh. The car was sold to a local man. The man came back to the dealer for routine maintenance and raved about how he was getting 35 miles to the gallon. A short while after, representatives from GM came to acquire the car back from the dealer. When they found out the car was sold the GM folks approached the buyer to buy back the car. At first the buyer wouldn't sell but eventually he did. In case you didn't catch that, this was a Buick Roadmaster. That's a big heavy car with a V-8 engine.

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