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Characterizing PC audio devices -- some challenges and their solutions

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bgflex
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re: Characterizing PC audio devices -- some challenges and their solutions
bgflex   4/3/2012 8:35:49 AM
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I get it. Can you suggest an affordable sound card in the meantime?

Ultragod
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re: Characterizing PC audio devices -- some challenges and their solutions
Ultragod   7/21/2010 1:11:43 AM
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It baffles me U guys on this site post a friggin' novel length essay all about IRRELEVANT design features of a sound product. There R only 2 relevant features: 1) How many audio channels? 2) Does it maintain the source file's sample rate throughout? & THAT IS IT! Even something with krap S/N ratio sounds better than some 'latest greatest' ear-bleed special like Realtek or C-Media or AMD or god knows what resample hell. & yes I've tried them & I know.

Ultragod
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re: Characterizing PC audio devices -- some challenges and their solutions
Ultragod   7/21/2010 1:08:41 AM
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BTW As every tech-oriented person already knows, the fact that resampling DESTROYS sound quality is BY DESIGN. They did it ON PURPOSE, with full disclosure the goal was 2 RUIN sound quality, 2 discourage people from using 'professional' audio gear 2 copy CDs & stuff. So, in their 'infinite wisdom' they created 2 standards - 44Khz, & 48Khz, & N E thing that does not evenly divide, as we know, well the sound in the end becomes thin, fake, harsh - about as smooth as broken glass =) Doesn't matter how U wanna' slice it. If it's not an even multiple, it's gone - ruined 4-EVER! =( It's not some 'conspiracy' joke. It's reality & U all know it. The source sample rate must B maintained throughout 4 best quality. If it resamples N E thing, just say NEXT & relegate that design 2 the junk bin where it belongs.

Ultragod
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re: Characterizing PC audio devices -- some challenges and their solutions
Ultragod   7/21/2010 1:04:24 AM
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What the world needs is a USB device that does not resample, EVER, but locks 2 the CPU clock & maintains the native sample rate of the source material throughout, top 2 bottom, always & forever - NO RESAMPLING EVER! It is the #1 reason most computers sound like absolute garbage. There is no need 2 buy fancy external converters & stuff 4 high end stereos & home theaters so long as everything is maintained always in the sample rate of the source. I repeat: NEVER resample @ a different sample rate. ALL sample rate converters & codecs that resample things SUK & DESTROY the sound quality. Now tell me which chipset/codec combinations NEVER resample. So far it seems only the older 'garbage' Dells do it this way, with SoundMAX chips, & 4 this reason, these 'throwaway obsolete junk' Dells sound 10,000X better than most systems costing $2,000 or more. Don't believe it? A/B compare them! =) E-Mail me at 'terabyte_pete at hotmail dot com' if U wanna' answer my question, or launch a product 4 USB as I described. Thanx =D

rpell
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re: Characterizing PC audio devices -- some challenges and their solutions
rpell   4/16/2008 2:52:21 AM
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I'll check into it. Another article on computer audio is probably overdue anyway. Thanks for the reminder! Rich Pell Editor Audio DesignLine

JSM
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re: Characterizing PC audio devices -- some challenges and their solutions
JSM   4/15/2008 4:15:48 PM
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Excellent article - thank you very much. Any latest updates?

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