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Electronic Control for One-cylinder Engines

10/26/2009 12:00 PM EDT
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DJanes
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re: Electronic Control for One-cylinder Engines
DJanes   12/9/2009 2:26:17 PM
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I thinkthe author's assumption is that legislation will mandate these changes, therefore the electrical system will come. The author's company, Freescale, is a semiconductor company. Thus the focus on the electronic components, and "glossing over" the electrical system. I agree with mark_w that automotive electronics have made great strides in reliability, particularly over the last 4 years. Semiconductors have played a major role in the reliability improvements, and automotive semiconductor companies can do a lot to help small engine manufacturers with reliability.

Natrajaprabhu
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re: Electronic Control for One-cylinder Engines
Natrajaprabhu   11/18/2009 12:51:52 PM
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I have no idea

Jeff_Mo
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re: Electronic Control for One-cylinder Engines
Jeff_Mo   11/5/2009 3:53:43 AM
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The 'battery' power source in Fig 1 just ain't gonna happen for the small pull-start market, but users might be OK with multiple starter pulls allowing the flywheel alternator to juice up a supercap. JS

Lloyd P
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re: Electronic Control for One-cylinder Engines
Lloyd P   11/5/2009 3:39:45 AM
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I recently retired from a company that developed a line of electronic controllers for small engine applications about 15 years ago. The project was way far ahead of it's time and failed miserably. The writer glosses over the fact that most small engine applications, except for riding mowers and small tractors, have no electrical system, other than the magneto to generate spark. A battery and charging system will also be required to successfully integrate electronics into small engine applications.

mark_w
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re: Electronic Control for One-cylinder Engines
mark_w   11/4/2009 6:15:40 PM
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Weight and cost seem like legitimate concerns, but automotive electronics can be made pretty reliable. When they aren't, it is usually because specification, design, testing or manufacture have been inadequate. Now whether the manufacturers of leaf blowers can reach the same level of sophistication in this regard as auto suppliers is an open question...

MikeDuvall
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re: Electronic Control for One-cylinder Engines
MikeDuvall   11/4/2009 2:26:29 PM
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My first thought is this is going to be a lot less reliable than what it replaces. More electronics in and exposed environment means more failures. Also as you increase the cost of the electronics you increase the likeyhood the customer will just throw the device away. I have a leaf blower with a bad ignition module. When it runs out of gas I must wait for it cool off to almost stone cold before I can restart it. once it cools off it starts on the first pull. The ignition module cost about $45. I bought a brand new unit with all new attacments for $99 on sale.

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