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Exceeding the standard for wireless sensor networks

2/26/2008 11:00 AM EST
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cjwang_1225
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re: Exceeding the standard for wireless sensor networks
cjwang_1225   3/17/2008 11:35:10 AM
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Actually, Zigbee was originally meant for industrial/commercial applications instead of consumer markets. There was a need for wireless sensor networks to control the machinery in factories, buildings, and other industrial scenarios. That's one of the main reasons that they spent a lot of time trying to make the spec robust. Rod Morris is probably right that it might be more than what's required if all you want to do is switch on a couple of lights in your house, but if you want those lights to automatically dim to a certain value whenever you enter the room, your TV to turn on to your favorite channel, and your air conditioner to set to the temperature you want, Zigbee is probably the better bet. Sony recently announced their TVs will be using Zigbee for the remote controls. Hitachi will be using it for their air conditioner controls. And the public Zigbee Home Automation profile has categories for light dimming, curtain control, HVAC, etc. I don't doubt that ANT is a good protocol, and Zigbee is a bit heavy on the protocol, but so is TCP/IP. The main usefulness for both is that a lot of work went into interoperability. If you want more info, you can check out my open source Zigbee development blog at http://www.freaklabs.org

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