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DRAM: the field for material and process innovation

11/16/2009 05:00 AM EST
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krisi
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re: DRAM: the field for material and process innovation
krisi   3/3/2012 3:09:08 PM
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Nice article Arabinda, would you be interested in expanding it to a chapter for the memory book I am currently editing? kris.iniewski@gmail.com

double-o-nothing
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re: DRAM: the field for material and process innovation
double-o-nothing   3/1/2012 12:42:30 AM
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@Robotics Developer, redundancy is a good point. But the redundant parts are still counted in the die efficiency, even though not used?

Robotics Developer
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re: DRAM: the field for material and process innovation
Robotics Developer   2/29/2012 7:54:04 PM
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If I remember correctly, one of the major issues with the reduced features is the wafer yield due to bad cells in arrays. One way that was used (not sure if everyone does this now) was to provide redundant rows/arrays and at die test blow fuses to switch to good from bad arrays. The thing about DRAM technology was not just that it drove the process but it lead the way to maturing of the process due to the large volumes that DRAMs entailed. I look forward to the next leap in technology (what ever that is).

double-o-nothing
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re: DRAM: the field for material and process innovation
double-o-nothing   2/29/2012 5:29:51 AM
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Is die efficiency still ~ half? Many DRAM photos look completely occupied by the array.

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