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Convert parallel impedances to series impedances

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Bernt
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re: Convert parallel impedances to series impedances
Bernt   7/5/2010 9:40:42 AM
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Dear Mr. Sum. The plot is just an illustration of how reactances interacts. The main idea of walking from Xs -> Xp is valid for any frequencies and therefore the transformation is very useful to understand the math behind and solve it easier. If you need to use it or not just depends of what tools you have. If you don't have the math tools for PC, remember how to use this method and the theory behind smith and you will do fine just with a pen and paper. Bernt-Olov Hellstrom Field application engineer National Semiconductor

Dominus
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re: Convert parallel impedances to series impedances
Dominus   7/1/2010 6:45:26 AM
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I do not think this will work because the transformation is valid for only one frequency. It follows that if you plot the frequency response of the original circuit you will find that the frequency response of the so called equivalent circuit will be quite different. This can easily be verified by comparing the response plots. K. Kit Sum kkitsum@gmail.com

amulcock
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re: Convert parallel impedances to series impedances
amulcock   6/30/2010 5:46:40 PM
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Oh so close.... To the question.. Which is how to design balanced ( i.e. parallel ) filters. If I have a three terminal filter, with a ground, how do I convert it to a 4 terminal floating filter ? You sound like the sort of person that knows..

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