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PCM scalability--Myth or realistic device projection

8/19/2010 01:24 AM EDT
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JanineLove
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re: PCM scalability--Myth or realistic device projection
JanineLove   12/2/2010 5:55:04 PM
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See part two here: http://www.eetimes.com/design/memory-design/4210054/PCM-Scalability-The-Myth--Part-2-?Ecosystem=memory-design

Allen Wallace
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re: PCM scalability--Myth or realistic device projection
Allen Wallace   10/20/2010 2:55:53 PM
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Ron Neale, Can you provide more details on your proposed low-cost experiments for student regarding PCM? I mentor High school students with advance science fair projects and I'd like to suggest PCM to one of my students. Allen Wallace

zman_tekinsil
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re: PCM scalability--Myth or realistic device projection
zman_tekinsil   9/6/2010 2:49:08 PM
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I appreciated the content and details in this article. Some Numonyx people, now part of Micron took on the PCM doubters: http://www.eetimes.com/electronics-news/4084947/Numonyx-CEO-takes-on-PCM-doubters. Is this a narrow-minded objection or a marketing fluff!

R G.Neale
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re: PCM scalability--Myth or realistic device projection
R G.Neale   9/6/2010 12:24:39 PM
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Contd from previous post/ For a memory device based on structural change to succeed what appears to be needed is some electrically “assisted” structural change that when removed has a highly improbable chance of reforming in an exactly ordered manner, thermally or electrically. For read the resonance of a particular structural shape is detected not general crystallization. I have seen the term “vacancy ordering” described to account for the memory effect in one of the new resistive memory devices. If that does not involve structural ordering, i.e. a nano-phase change then finding the structural equivalent would be one direction to pursue. In that regard it might be worth pursuing nano-filaments and revisiting the Work of Prof LeCoomber, (1980s) amorphous silicon, University, Scotland and Ovshinsky (1970s)chalcogenides. Both demonstrated the step-like resonant effects in the V-I characteristics of in two terminal amorphous silicon and chalcogenides devices respectively. This author, and many others, saw the Ovshinsky demonstrations. At the time they were dismissed as contact art effects, although accounting for the equal spacing and exact multiples of amplitude of the “resonance” steps was a little more than difficult. This writer had many conversations with Prof LeCoomber both then and in his paper he was firmly convinced the steps in the observed V-I characteristics were caused by resonance in micro or nano-filaments in both cases.

R G.Neale
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re: PCM scalability--Myth or realistic device projection
R G.Neale   9/6/2010 11:47:18 AM
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What is the next memory technology? If really knew I think I would be working on it or investing in it. I think the research and development on NVM or universal memory must continue on many fronts. That includes all of: electrically manipulated structural change (including PCM), resistance effects, magnetic effects, ferro-electric effects, optical and nano structures. Contrary to the impression that my paper above may have given to some, I think the electrical manipulated structural change may have a role to play, without specifying the materials. My purpose was to use existing published and peer group reviewed data as a prediction tool to expose the problems with PCM devices (sub 30nm) that could not at the moment be fabricated. Furthermore it was also to bring current density and electro-migration to a position high on the list of serious PCM problems to be discussed. I wanted to replace unreal promises with real problems.

Helicopter
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re: PCM scalability--Myth or realistic device projection
Helicopter   9/2/2010 5:36:11 AM
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excellent technical analysis in your view, what is the next memory technology?

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