Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Design How-To

Electronics meets the challenges of patient monitors

NO RATINGS
More Related Links
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
eewiz
User Rank
CEO
re: Electronics meets the challenges of patient monitors
eewiz   8/30/2010 6:55:20 AM
NO RATINGS
I think a real growth in medical electronics is yet to happen. It occurs when everyone's health is continually monitored using wearable body area sensor network & Cellphones. The problem is the lack of integration and high power consumption of discrete components because of which a huge battery is required for reasonable lifetime. I wonder why Intersil or other manufacturers dont consider integrating all the components like Multiplexer & Amplifier into a single chip with a low power wireless.

Dr. Phil
User Rank
Rookie
re: Electronics meets the challenges of patient monitors
Dr. Phil   8/27/2010 2:23:50 AM
NO RATINGS
Given the explosion of computing power in the last 20 yrs or so we now have a PDA capable of being a 2D ultrasound machine. Just buy a ~$250 USB U/S probe and you are on your way. Gradiations of precision are about useless anymore given the signals we monitor in medicine. Most all modern chips are up to the task. Laptops are king in clinical medicine these days, cheap and capable...just ad a sensor and you have plenty of horse power for just about anything except maybe for MRI/CAT/PET scanning and data extrapolation and smoothing. Biological specimens past the DNA are rather simple things for metering in today's world. A lot of the devices are frankly over priced due to law suits not tech innovations.

TamaraSchmitz
User Rank
Rookie
re: Electronics meets the challenges of patient monitors
TamaraSchmitz   8/23/2010 7:31:49 PM
NO RATINGS
As for t.alex's question, you are right about main areas of concern between portable and hospital grade equipment. Portable tends to run on batteries (needs charging/discharging circuitry), has been optimized for low power (to save those batteries) and therefore has sacrificed some of its precision when compared to the hospital-grade versions.

_hm
User Rank
CEO
re: Electronics meets the challenges of patient monitors
_hm   8/23/2010 3:09:46 PM
NO RATINGS
Biomedical instrumentation is evolving. However, it needs to much accelerate this evolution. When you get an opportunity to closely observe high cost biomedical systems, you may find old type part/topology and quite poor or not so friendly firmware. As mentioned in this article, many electronic modules are common to all. Can group of manufacturers provide general purpose computing electronic module for all different biomedical measurements? After that, user has to purchase only required sensor module and associated software? Can this general purpose module be desktop/laptop so that we can exploit its ubiquitous availability, powerful processing speed, available wired/wireless communication interfaces and plethora of application development tools? Can sensor module be made self contained with wireless communication (Bluetooth, wireless USB or similar) and wireless charging? Application software will automatically identify all sensor modules and perform auto calibration. Can biomedical standardization body write common minimum requirement specifications and their interface to computing devices? They may add other smart devices like ipad or smart phones as required. This will significantly reduce overall cost of healthcare as related to biomedical instrumentation. Also wireless sensors (with one computing platform or networked computing platforms in hospital environment) adds lot to comfort of patients and healthcare professionals.

t.alex
User Rank
Rookie
re: Electronics meets the challenges of patient monitors
t.alex   8/23/2010 3:58:32 AM
NO RATINGS
Developing medical applications is always interesting as it poses wide level of challenges. Regarding this "Hospital-grade equipment has different requirements than portable home-based system", Could the author elaborate more on this? Are these about temperature, operating voltage range, or precision level?

Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
EE Times Senior Technical Editor Martin Rowe will interview EMC engineer Kenneth Wyatt.
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Flash Poll