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Using FPGAs in mission-critical systems

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anne-francoise.pele
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re: Using FPGAs in mission-critical systems
anne-francoise.pele   7/16/2012 3:25:01 PM
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Dear Mario, I have made the diagrams more readable. Click on the images to enlarge them. Best, Anne-Francoise Pele

karax
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re: Using FPGAs in mission-critical systems
karax   12/9/2010 10:18:10 AM
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Talking about simulation and verification tool SST tool from nebrija uses built-in simulator commands, that is, to feed the simulator with the appropriate commands to control the simulation or inject faults (PERL/TCL). This method is easy to implement and does not require the modification of circuit models. On the contrary, the command parsing and the reaction times of the simulator present a performance reduction and make that unviable for big circuits. I know other advanced techniques to speed up the simulation process using FLI (Modelsim) and other emulation HW methods in FPGA.

Bob Lacovara
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re: Using FPGAs in mission-critical systems
Bob Lacovara   12/8/2010 6:35:30 PM
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This is more than just good advice for mission critical implementations. Many of the suggestions would apply equally well to software. Of course, viewed from the hardware description language perspective, the hardware is software...not that I wish to start a philosophic discussion on that score. But state machines and software systems both feature the ability to find themselves at execution points or states unexpectedly, and can sport unreachable states, and so on. I was bemused to find that one-hot machines were in use: I wasn't aware that much use had been made of one-hot architectures. Interested readers might want to go to abebooks and find a copy of Hill and Peterson's "Digital Logic and State Machine Design" (even the 2nd edition will do) wherein they will find a pedagogical HDL that compiles into a one-hot model. Another interesting thing about one-hot designs is that parallel execution is possible under some circumstances by allowing more than one flop to be hot at once. Suitable precautions and procedures are required, though.

Mario Blunk
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re: Using FPGAs in mission-critical systems
Mario Blunk   12/8/2010 8:03:31 AM
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Interesting work but the flow diagrams are hard to read. Please make them readable for the public. Thank you.

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