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ESPN's broadcast of Breeder's Cup benefits from RF and microwave technology

12/20/2010 09:16 PM EST
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Luis Sanchez
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re: ESPN's broadcast of Breeder's Cup benefits from RF and microwave technology
Luis Sanchez   12/22/2010 9:43:29 PM
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I find this article interesting. I don't know much of the field in sports coverage but the article does allow us to see all the work related with RF. Different spectrums were used for different purposes and with the aim of not overlapping channels. It must've been expensive to deploy the wireless towers and the fiber optic but I suppose this equipment will be re-used to cover some other events. I think the next step would be to add some small cameras to the jockeys themselves right? Imagine riding along with the winner!

MVP
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re: ESPN's broadcast of Breeder's Cup benefits from RF and microwave technology
MVP   12/21/2010 4:10:14 PM
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Rich-- Thnak you for taking the time to post a comment. Typically we are not at liberty, due to Broadcast rights issues, to distribute the video from the services we provide. In the article, we tried our best to describe what we did that made the event special but as always with broadcasting, the old adage of a picture telling a thosand words is appropos. You can find some clips of the races that day on ESPN.com and also, please see our web site for video of other events we have serviced. Regards, Mark @ BSI.

JanineLove
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re: ESPN's broadcast of Breeder's Cup benefits from RF and microwave technology
JanineLove   12/20/2010 9:29:38 PM
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I asked BSI to write this article in order to tell us more about this application as part of our RF in Action series.

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