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Using a thermoelectronic assembly (TEA) to cool electronic systems and modules

1/21/2011 03:55 PM EST
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ssco00
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re: Using a thermoelectronic assembly (TEA) to cool electronic systems and modules
ssco00   2/3/2011 8:24:54 PM
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A large auto company used such devices to provide heating and cooling in the front seats of its high end SUV. I was preparing electrical schematics for the service manuals and saw the seat drawings. I noticed the fan and ductwork attached to the TED and saw that, of course, it ran to the rear edge of the seat and the bottom edge of the back to move heat to or from the passenger space. Some time later I found that there had been many complaints that the system did not function. No one had communicated to the upholstery designer the need to expose the open end of the duct to the passenger air with the result that the leather was stretched tightly across the end of the duct, sealing it very effectively and rendering the system useless.

Crystal Ltd
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re: Using a thermoelectronic assembly (TEA) to cool electronic systems and modules
Crystal Ltd   2/3/2011 7:30:58 AM
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The AA-024-12-22-00-00 produces 25W of cooling power.

Crystal Ltd
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re: Using a thermoelectronic assembly (TEA) to cool electronic systems and modules
Crystal Ltd   2/3/2011 7:29:24 AM
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I would say the main advantage of thermoelectric devices is ability to switch cooling/heating mode by changing current flow direction. That is why the TEAs can change the temperature very fast and perform precise temperature control.

NJK
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re: Using a thermoelectronic assembly (TEA) to cool electronic systems and modules
NJK   1/27/2011 10:49:28 PM
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The comment about less noise than refgireated systems is debatable. The hotside heatsink must dissipate not only the pumped heat, but the heat generated by the TE itself, hence the typical large external heatsinks. These usually require fan forced cooling, which is certainly not quiet.

Sanjib.A
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re: Using a thermoelectronic assembly (TEA) to cool electronic systems and modules
Sanjib.A   1/26/2011 4:41:47 PM
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Thanks @agk for providing the link. Looking at the list, the first one "AA-024-12-22-00-00" operates on 12V and draws 2.4A, so this TEA device consumes ~24 watts. Then what is its cooling capacity? Is it 6 watts only? Doesn't sound good to me. May be I am making some mistake?

agk
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re: Using a thermoelectronic assembly (TEA) to cool electronic systems and modules
agk   1/26/2011 5:26:47 AM
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Hi Sanjib The below link gives all the information about the air to air coolers. Generally they use TEC or TEM modules and as on date these are only 25% efficient when compared to compressor basedsystems. http://lairdtech.thomasnet.com/viewitems/thermoelectric-assemblies/powercool-air-air-systems-aa-assemblies?

_hm
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re: Using a thermoelectronic assembly (TEA) to cool electronic systems and modules
_hm   1/23/2011 5:40:36 AM
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TEA are good to cool device/system and control their precise temperature. However, it does need additional power to accomplish this. In some applications, you may like to lower the temperature and may like to control it within some range, however, you do not have much additional power to do this. It may be battery operated portable system. What are the solution for TEA system which can offer combine solution of cooling system and enrgy harvester? What can be the maxiumum efficiency of this system? Can it be made with not so complex circuitry?

Sanjib.A
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re: Using a thermoelectronic assembly (TEA) to cool electronic systems and modules
Sanjib.A   1/22/2011 11:11:55 AM
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I am interested know if I can use direct-to-air assembly to suck the heat out of my PCB. Can this be used on the PCBs with live components or only with the enclosures? Looks like, these thermo-electric assemblies consume power? How much power a TEA would consume if the heat capacity is 10 watts and what would be its dimensions (size)?

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