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NAND 201: the continued evolution of NAND Flash

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richi777
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re: NAND 201: the continued evolution of NAND Flash
richi777   3/3/2011 11:43:42 PM
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ClearNand is a good product, similar to LBA-Nand from Toshiba. Best regards !

Jim.Cooke
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re: NAND 201: the continued evolution of NAND Flash
Jim.Cooke   2/27/2011 4:16:04 PM
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We expect to see a continued reduction in endurance with each process shrink. However, with each process shrink, the densities are doubling. With the increased density, and proper wear leveling, the net result is about equal, to the user.

G.SR
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re: NAND 201: the continued evolution of NAND Flash
G.SR   2/23/2011 5:19:16 AM
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Hi, We need to store ECC information while writing data to NAND right. My understanding is we are doing so because, some errors might occur while reading DATA from NAND. What will happen if error occurs while reading NAND Spare Area. Is it guaranteed that no errors occur when we read from the Spare Area? Thank You & Regards, GSR

MKC
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re: NAND 201: the continued evolution of NAND Flash
MKC   2/17/2011 11:58:26 PM
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With smaller geometries, do per page voltages (during reads and especially programs) decrease at some rate (relative to geometry reductions)? Or do they hover around ~5 and ~20V (ignoring selected or unselected page voltages)?

DrFPGA
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re: NAND 201: the continued evolution of NAND Flash
DrFPGA   2/17/2011 8:54:35 PM
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Any thoughts on what happens to endurance as we go to smaller lithography? Can we expect dramatic changes?

resistion
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re: NAND 201: the continued evolution of NAND Flash
resistion   2/17/2011 5:32:35 PM
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I think forward insights got it backwards. As smaller geometries emerge, mlc and 8lc become less viable, so slc should relatively grow.

katgod
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re: NAND 201: the continued evolution of NAND Flash
katgod   2/16/2011 7:11:39 PM
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Nice overview

Jim.Cooke
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re: NAND 201: the continued evolution of NAND Flash
Jim.Cooke   2/15/2011 1:34:42 PM
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Hi Kinnar, The reason 16LC has not developed as much as you would have expected is because it is very difficult. As the basic NAND cell continues to shrink, the total number of electrons available in each cell also shrinks. This makes it very difficult to store 16 levels reliably.

Kinnar
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re: NAND 201: the continued evolution of NAND Flash
Kinnar   2/15/2011 7:39:18 AM
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It was a very kind suggestion, and this article talks very well about the NAND Memories. I was expecting more adoption of 16LC devices but article talks that this will no more be in production as it is not reliable. So does it say that it will not be possible to have more storage on NAND? or does it limit the expandability of NAND Memories?

JanineLove
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re: NAND 201: the continued evolution of NAND Flash
JanineLove   2/13/2011 11:50:15 PM
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I recently asked Jim for this follow-up to his wildly popular NAND 101 article, and he graciously agreed. Hope you enjoy it. Thanks Jim.

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