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Plan strategies for adopting Model-Based Design for embedded applications: Part 1—Challenges and impact

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mfkinco
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re: Plan strategies for adopting Model-Based Design for embedded applications: Part 1—Challenges and impact
mfkinco   12/14/2011 7:29:40 PM
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We have found it critical to ensure that requirements are well defined and validated and then integrated to your models via trace. Integrity has leading RM capabilities and a great integration to Mathworks software that supports trace to model elements and even trace through to generated artifacts. http://www.mks.com/solutions/discipline/modeling-simulation

Eric Dillaber, MathWorks
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re: Plan strategies for adopting Model-Based Design for embedded applications: Part 1—Challenges and impact
Eric Dillaber, MathWorks   3/29/2011 9:39:25 PM
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A variety of targets are available from MathWorks, processor manufacturers, and other tool providers (here is a list from MathWorks: http://www.mathworks.com/products/rtwembedded/supportedio.html). These typically include I/O drivers, scheduler and startup code to deploy generated code onto embedded hardware. They often also provide processor-specific code to accelerate math operations. This approach is very good for getting a system up and running quickly. In the cases where target support isn’t already available for a specific processor, open APIs in Simulink and consulting services are available to build a target quickly. Many production organizations, on the other hand, take a different approach. They generate standard, processor independent C code that can be integrated with existing source code (including optimized math routines), and also be reused across different processor families. Do other readers have best practices for integrating generated code with processor targets to share?

Krutsch
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re: Plan strategies for adopting Model-Based Design for embedded applications: Part 1—Challenges and impact
Krutsch   3/9/2011 8:10:11 AM
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Hi, I see a problem with MBD in terms that not all hardware providers deliver toolboxes with drivers and startup code to actually start working. One has to use generic C code and not targeted code (for the specific architecture) and this lowers performances. How does MathWorks attack this problem in terms of collaboration with silicon providers? From my point of view things have to be moving like this: - Drivers and startup code have to be provided and easy put to work in the modeling environment so that hardware in the loop can be made possible - Use dedicated compilers(usually hardware providers deliver also compilers) and allow defining complex instructions (for instance if my architecture knows to make multiply and accumulate that the instruction has to be mapped somehow into the code) This should be made simple somehow, without reading 1k pages of useless materials and hacking into matlab.

PCBkey
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re: Plan strategies for adopting Model-Based Design for embedded applications: Part 1—Challenges and impact
PCBkey   3/9/2011 7:04:14 AM
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Could you please list out the various tools available for model based design. Is model based designs means we need not to write C codes manually.

Wensi Jin, MathWorks
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re: Plan strategies for adopting Model-Based Design for embedded applications: Part 1—Challenges and impact
Wensi Jin, MathWorks   3/3/2011 11:49:31 PM
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Tools for Model-Based Design have been in use for a long time. Also, there is already a wealth of knowledge in how to get started with Model-Based Design for simulation or prototyping. However, as the use of Model-Based Design moves from research into product development, and from using a small set of tools in individual groups to deploying a tool chain across a large organization, many new questions emerge. For example, how should engineering resources be allocated to obtain the time savings in debugging (ie, finding and fixing errors earlier in the development process), how should the use of modeling, simulation, code generation, and verification tools be optimized, and etc. Also, how should Model-Based Design be rolled out in phases (small steps first)? We will attempt to address these questions in subsequent posts in this series. We welcome you to go through them and let us know your thoughts. What do other readers think? Is deploying Model-Based Design across large organizations something you would like some guidance on?

Peter Mueller
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re: Plan strategies for adopting Model-Based Design for embedded applications: Part 1—Challenges and impact
Peter Mueller   3/3/2011 7:42:18 PM
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It it always wise to start with small steps. If you've never used any modeling tool but just an editor and compiler thing about using a small and inexpensive tool first. If it works out go on ...

Aquib
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re: Plan strategies for adopting Model-Based Design for embedded applications: Part 1—Challenges and impact
Aquib   3/2/2011 8:42:02 PM
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The author has complicated an interesting topic by unnecessary explanations. Model Based Engineering has existed for decades, for software development with adoption procedures well defined and tested. The only difference between application development and embedded systems development is that the later requires special hardware. Hardware simulation has also existed for many years with organizations and embedded systems engineers quite use to it. New modelling software now exists that integrates the modelling practice and the virtual hardware, through automated code generation. Getting a modelling and simulation system to an organization is not as complicated as described. The virtual development environment is just another tool in the developer’s tool box. The ROI is in terms of time saved in debugging.

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