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Radar basics Part 1

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raf98
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re: Radar basics Part 1
raf98   6/8/2011 6:09:20 PM
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Regarding above PDF question, here is what I do. Highlight only the text and figures/pictures. Copy and paste into a new OpenOffice.org Writer document. Save the document as a .html file. The document will still refer to external links on the internet for the figures. Those links may go away with time. So open the document with a web browser (Firefox in the following example), and under File, do a Save Page As, and save it as an html document with a different name. This time the document will have a local sub-directory with all the figures in it, so it is stand-alone. Now if you wish, convert the local html document to a PDF with your favorite converter.

Michael Parker
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re: Radar basics Part 1
Michael Parker   6/6/2011 4:48:22 PM
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Responding to the request above, there is a very easy to read book, Introduction to Airborne Radar by Stimson, which dicusses the relationship between antenna dimensions and wavelength among other topics (chapters 8,38). There are many more advanced books devoted to antennas; one is Antennas: Fundamentals, Design and Measurement by Blake and Long. Hope this helps.

modulation
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re: Radar basics Part 1
modulation   6/6/2011 4:40:17 PM
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Hi, There are pdf version of this doc? Sidnei

Max The Magnificent
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re: Radar basics Part 1
Max The Magnificent   5/25/2011 9:38:41 PM
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Will do -- Max

ABRFENG
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re: Radar basics Part 1
ABRFENG   5/25/2011 7:39:26 PM
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Could you ask the author if he can provide some links to literature that details the relationship between the wavelength of the transmitted RF energy versus the diameter of the reflector? dnyberg2@gmail.com

Matt S.
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re: Radar basics Part 1
Matt S.   5/20/2011 6:33:39 PM
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I did some work a long time ago with doppler shift measurements using laser with diode pick-up used to measure blood flow rates in capillaries. I'd like to see a nice diagrammed description of how a doppler shift can be achieved by cross-correlating a Fourier Transform with the inverse Fourier Transform and how it can be visualized; i.e. hump moving left as the object approaches vs. hump moving right as object departs. Great article.

mgburr
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re: Radar basics Part 1
mgburr   5/20/2011 12:48:57 PM
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Looking forward to the SAR topic. I've never seen the explanation for Binning before, but then again I worked with X band radar on Helicopters and Doppler. I'm probably still more familiar and versed with 12.36uS and working out distances with that. Looking forward to how DSP integration improves smaller object detection also. Might be able to translate it over to tramp metal detection system improvements.

Michael Parker
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re: Radar basics Part 1
Michael Parker   5/19/2011 5:23:59 PM
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Hi Joe, Max and Jasio, This is the first of 5 articles. Topics coming are Doppler radar, beamforming, space-time adaptive radar, SAR, and some information on implemetation issues. Passive radar is receiving alot of interest these days, but is a pretty advanced topic. It is very challenging when the transmit waveform and rimig are not under control of the radar. I do not plan to cover this in this series, but maybe in future. I am attending and presenting at RadarCon in Kansas City next week, and hope to learn more onthis topic. Thanks for the encouragement so far, and hope the next four meet your expectations. Michael Parker

Max The Magnificent
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re: Radar basics Part 1
Max The Magnificent   5/19/2011 1:09:20 PM
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I'll pass this question on to the author and ask him to respond

Joe.Sleator
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re: Radar basics Part 1
Joe.Sleator   5/19/2011 9:24:08 AM
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I find passive radars the most exciting of all, from a DSP perspective. Will you be touching on those? i.e. systems that use transmitters of opportunity in bistatic/multistatic topology which exploits non-radar-specific transmitters like TV, radio, mobile phone/mobile internet, WiFi, etc. I've always been fascinated by the DSP challenges in such a system, and the ability for almost anybody to experiment with it, given a suitable receiver and DSP capability.

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