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Spray modeling improves engine combustion control and simulation

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Les_Slater
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re: Spray modeling improves engine combustion control and simulation
Les_Slater   5/21/2011 1:20:05 AM
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The differential! What about the differential? That's where things get a little complicated. The simplest solution would be two engines but that does not have to be the end of the world. With very high intake boost pressure and some combustion chamber magic we could maybe get the torque and power we needed with not too much greater than a combined displacement of 2 liters for a sub compact car. On the bright side 1,800 RPM gets us 134 miles per hour. The electric drive could be made to operate quite efficiently under 45 miles per hour. The battery size would not have to be that much larger than current hybrids of this size and performance. The engines would always be available for charging or shut down if not needed. No mechanical reverse would be needed. Les Slater Chicago

Les_Slater
User Rank
CEO
re: Spray modeling improves engine combustion control and simulation
Les_Slater   5/21/2011 1:19:01 AM
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Rolf, I've been watching the rapid advance of engine technology of late. There is a tendency for smaller engines with fewer cylinders that have great flexibility in maintaining quite high torque over a broad RPM range. It has been a pleasure to be introduced to the research going into modeling of the combustion process. My first thought is one of economics. It seems to me that the significant savings that you are talking about dwarf the cost of the computational machinery needed to help obtain those savings. It also would seem that the machines to do the crunching could be highly parallel, even to the extent of architecturally mimicking the 3-dimensional combustion grid that is being modeled. Second thought is also economic. All this effort should be in the public domain. Engine platforms should become a standardized commodity. There is already a tendency toward this within the large manufacturers such as the Volkswagen and Fiat groups. There is also a worldwide tendency to share some components such as transmissions. Third is technical. I've noticed that in my '04 VW New Beetle TDI that I can smoothly accelerate from about 900 RPM in 5th gear. That's from under 27 miles per hour. I thought about that for a while. Why not optimize an engine for reasonable torque at let's say 600 RPM? If we could drive the wheels directly we could save quite a bit of loss. 600 RPM at my 25.1 diameter tires comes out to 44.8 miles per hour. If we could drive electrically below that speed all we would need is a simple locking clutch. Les Slater Chicago

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