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Sterilization methods and impact on electronics in medical devices

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nair027
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Difference between H2O2 Vapour sterilization & H2O2 Gas Plasma Sterilization
nair027   10/26/2014 11:14:52 AM
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Dear Sir,

 

I would highly appreciate if you could help us to understand the 

Difference between H2O2 Vapour sterilization & H2O2 Gas Plasma Sterilization

 

Best Regards

Prasad Nair

India 

pnair027@gmail.com

00917498517921

eco smart organics
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re: Sterilization methods and impact on electronics in medical devices
eco smart organics   6/25/2013 11:32:21 AM
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Dear Mr B Brodhead, Please see my enquiry submitted below, re the use of Hydrogen Peroxide, with regard to potential damage to PCB's inside electronic equipment.... Any feedback from yourself, would be most appreciated too. We have a far less corrosive micro droplet dispersal method, that can achieve high level disinfection, without concerns regarding any longterm effects to PCB boards and components. You can contact me directly for full information via e mail: Andrew.keary@ecosmartorganics.co.uk Would be pleased to hear from you. Regards Andrew

eco smart organics
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re: Sterilization methods and impact on electronics in medical devices
eco smart organics   6/24/2013 11:43:16 AM
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Dear Bernhard, I am hoping that you and your colleagues can give further consideration to the use of a fine 6-12 micron wet misting fog, being produced by some companies, with Hydrogen Peroxide to effect an sterilisation of hospital wards/theatres. This type of operation is carried out from inside the centre of the rooms interior, not controlled within a sealed machine like an autoclave. The fine mist being able to travel over all surfaces present, plus potentially into open ventilation areas on electrical equipment too. Which currently is being left in the rooms being treated, taking up to 2-3 hours de contamination, before the areas are deemed safe for staff to return. My main concern regards the potential levels of condensation and interaction of the active ingredients to cause corrosive damage over time to sensitive medical equipment circuitry. At present it would appear that this has been seen to have NO immediate effect, however over several treatments there appears to be no real long term testing has been carried out ?? A link below shows a version from Bioquell for example, using a 30% w/w mix, although without contacting them, its not possible to gain full facts re product volumes dispersed, but its normally 30-60 minutes dispersal time, with extra time then left for drying out residues for an safe return of room environment over another hour. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbUbXvelRgE Please can you let me know if any specific rules or figures/guidelines are inplace within your EE Industry sector regarding corrosive effects ? Would this invalidate warrantees on equipment, if it was left in the room environment, during this de contamination process ? I look forward to your comments and overview, any specific tables or data would also be most welcome. Best regards Andrew Keary

BBrodhead
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re: Sterilization methods and impact on electronics in medical devices
BBrodhead   2/16/2012 6:51:52 PM
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Thank you for this information. Is there any additional information about the affect of these processes on the PCB material? Specifically, I am trying to determine if the autoclave process can cause delamination with multi-layer PCBs?

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