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IPv6 testing: Tips you need to know

4/23/2012 02:22 PM EDT
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Luis Sanchez
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re: IPv6 testing: Tips you need to know
Luis Sanchez   4/26/2012 6:45:11 PM
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This article lets me see that testing can be done with different tools but nowadays seem to be concentrating in using some kind of scripting language for automating tests. Also its necessary to use source code management to handle the set of scripts and an issue tracking system to follow up on bugs. But most importantly, a good test management system which simplifies and orders the test plan and execution. It also eases the reporting tasks. I once worked without a test management system and yikes... it sucks! Mostly at the time of gathering the results and preparing a report. Ideally all these systems should be linked so that if there's a failure or bug found in a certain test case, the test plan should link with the issue tracking system where a bug for that defect should reside. Prove of the failure in the form of log files should also be linked with the bug and the issue tracking system. Ideally perhaps through good old fashion hyperlinks. Testing is good when you have the right tools!

Embedded SW Dev
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re: IPv6 testing: Tips you need to know
Embedded SW Dev   4/26/2012 8:00:01 PM
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One comment about remote testing. The IPv6 test equipment should be connected to the system(s)-under-test by a L2 network. Using a router can prevent some of the malformed packets from making it to the system under test.

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