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Slideshow: China and the future of solar power

10/9/2012 10:13 PM EDT
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przemek
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re: Slideshow: China and the future of solar power
przemek   6/25/2013 10:20:55 PM
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Solyndra funding wasn't even loans, but loan guarantees, i.e. insurance. Solyndra had flawed business model, and perhaps the risk was mispriced---but the deal worked as designed. We do understand the need for insurance, and the idea that the insurer can lose on any particular transaction, and only has to come out ahead in the long term?

Intellijoule
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re: Slideshow: China and the future of solar power
Intellijoule   2/22/2013 5:10:43 PM
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learn Chinese

rs_92122
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re: Slideshow: China and the future of solar power
rs_92122   11/1/2012 8:28:56 PM
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Solar is the answer, not nuclear. Both Germany and Japan are shutting down nuclear power plants. SCE has decided to forego adding a third reactor at San Onofre and the other two are still shut down. Solar power plants are cheaper to set up and run than ANY alternative, at less than $2 per watt.

SkyhighSG
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re: Slideshow: China and the future of solar power
SkyhighSG   10/17/2012 1:31:48 PM
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Let's analyse things objectively. We should not bring in international politics and turn this topic dirty. The market wants cheaper and quality solar panels. China is satisfying this demand with competitive cost down with generally acceptable quality. If US can do the same, why not? Many things today are made in China. We should not perceive China as making low quality products. This is very biased views that you see in Hollywood movies. If you still see things this way, you are very unprofessional. There are also quality products at reasonable price made in China and if this is what the market is looking for, let the market force decices.

DMcCunney
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re: Slideshow: China and the future of solar power
DMcCunney   10/15/2012 4:23:51 AM
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I'm in Manhattan, but no surprise. As mentioned, the last thing ConEd wants to do is build new generating capacity. Anything they can do to promote more efficient usage of what they already generate is a no-brainer yes notion.

george.leopold
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re: Slideshow: China and the future of solar power
george.leopold   10/12/2012 1:31:29 PM
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ConEd launched a smart grid initiative in Queens several years ago.

DMcCunney
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re: Slideshow: China and the future of solar power
DMcCunney   10/12/2012 3:23:38 AM
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Solar can be cost competitive in some areas and applications. But despite the advantages posed by nuclear power, it will have problems simply because it *is* nuclear power, and there is a huge amount of entrenched resistance to the notion, and an awful lot of ignorance about the safety of nuclear power. (The Fukashima reactor disaster in Japan did not help, even if the real lesson is that Fukashima was set up wrong to begin with.)

DMcCunney
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re: Slideshow: China and the future of solar power
DMcCunney   10/12/2012 3:15:44 AM
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The problem for the operators is that they are generally regulated utilities. The sorts of upgrades required cost a lot of money, and the money will have to come out of the prices charged for power. Getting regulator approval to make the upgrades, permit the bond issues needed to finance it, and raise the rates to pay for it will be very difficult and a political nightmare. It will cost a lot of money, and everyone will say someone *else* should pay for it. Things like that are a major reason why ConEd in NYC is pushing conservation and energy efficiency as hard as they can. The last thing they want to do is build new generating capacity because of all the problems involved in doing it.

DMcCunney
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re: Slideshow: China and the future of solar power
DMcCunney   10/12/2012 3:09:38 AM
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I'd call that stupid, all told. The net effect is to drive up the cost of photovoltaic installations and slow the growth of photovoltaic use. From where I sit, the opportunities for US businesses are in sales, installation, and support, and the cheaper the components are that they build solar installations out of, the better a price they can offer and the faster they will grow. Let the Chinese plants that failed to correctly forecast demand go bust turning out panels they can only sell below cost. That's an *opportunity* for US outfits installing photovoltaics, because they can get the parts cheap.

DMcCunney
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re: Slideshow: China and the future of solar power
DMcCunney   10/12/2012 2:59:35 AM
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Yep, they are, and investment by the government may not be really relevant. The same problems would occur if they were doing things entirely with private capital. In any new market like this, a bunch of people will jump in seeing an opportunity, but some will fail and go under or be acquired. We've seen the pattern over and over here, as markets shake down till there are a few dominant supplies and a batch of smaller niche players. The Chinese official quoted unhappy at the prospect that 2/3s of the current Chinese suppliers will go belly up arguably should not be - it's simply the way the markets work, and the ones that survive will be better for the experience.

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