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Embedded systems next for hack attacks

2/26/2013 02:30 PM EST
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tomjose2020
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re: Embedded systems next for hack attacks
tomjose2020   3/14/2013 9:08:09 AM
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:)

Olaf.Barheine
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re: Embedded systems next for hack attacks
Olaf.Barheine   3/2/2013 2:50:45 PM
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I think, the main problem is that we software developers do not have the same criminal energy like hackers. Maybe, we should think like hackers when we develop our systems.

Duane Benson
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re: Embedded systems next for hack attacks
Duane Benson   2/27/2013 7:11:18 PM
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I would think that simple devices are easier to secure. They don't have the same horsepower available for encryption/decryption, but they have far fewer vulnerable spots than a complex system. I doubt that anyone knows how many points and methods of potential entry there are for a typical PC. A blue tooth device may have only one point of entry and only one protocol to defend. If the 8-bit MCUs don't have enough power to be secure, even at that level, maybe the low-cost 32 bits will be able to make greater inroads by meeting that requirement.

DrQuine
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re: Embedded systems next for hack attacks
DrQuine   2/27/2013 2:43:55 AM
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Let's not forget StuxNet which infiltrated machine control systems. Clearly there is a vulnerability in industrial control equipments.

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