Breaking News
Design How-To

Freescale preps IoT attack with tiny MCU

2/26/2013 08:21 PM EST
16 comments
NO RATINGS
More Related Links
View Comments: Oldest First | Newest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 2
docdivakar
User Rank
Manager
re: Freescale preps IoT attack with tiny MCU
docdivakar   2/28/2013 7:45:25 AM
NO RATINGS
Rick, you are hitting on one of the hurdles M2M faces in the existing (brown field) and new (green field) markets. Industrial automation (SCADA, CAN) have many applications but penetration there has been a tough sell for wireless M2M nodes. Legacy implementations from the likes of GE, Rockwell, are not going to be displaced any time soon. Naturally some of the attention has been turned toward medical monitoring where many new startups have sprung lately in the Silicon Valley (I think I introduced one of them to you at DesignCon 2013). I hope 2013 is the year a better picture emerges for IoT. There is a lot that is needed in software solutions like analytics and prognostics. MP Divakar

yazhouren
User Rank
Rookie
re: Freescale preps IoT attack with tiny MCU
yazhouren   2/28/2013 8:58:34 AM
NO RATINGS
A good chip! I like it. but for IOT, things would be connected to each other.

yazhouren
User Rank
Rookie
re: Freescale preps IoT attack with tiny MCU
yazhouren   2/28/2013 8:59:17 AM
NO RATINGS
so, some things need more power MCU.

JohnM555
User Rank
Rookie
re: Freescale preps IoT attack with tiny MCU
JohnM555   2/28/2013 5:02:19 PM
NO RATINGS
@daleste, your question might have a very simple response that is not about complex architectural analysis on 8/16/32 bits. Per ARM's own claim, the M0 core is 32-bit and is the smallest ARM core available. ARM jumped a bit over developing 16-bit cores.

y_sasaki
User Rank
CEO
re: Freescale preps IoT attack with tiny MCU
y_sasaki   2/28/2013 8:00:37 PM
NO RATINGS
There's ongoing discussion what wireless architecture will be "the one" for (hopefully) uprising IoT market. Low-power WiFi, Bluetooth LE, 802.15.4 Zigbee are leading the market, but there's also more than a dozen of so-called "optimized for IoT" architectures (ANT+, Z-Wave, EnOcean, MyraNet, DASH7, WirelessHART... you name it). Many uses 2.4GHz but some uses sub-GHz band. Freescale offers two types of "Kinetis W" series radio-integrated MCUs, KW01 with proprietary sub-GHz radio and KW20 with 2.4GHz 802.15.4. As long as I know, there's no Freescale Bluetooth (LE) chip has been released yet. It is interesting to see how they can do well with "multi-mode radio" chip, and how do they marketing discrete radio chip versus KW series radio-integrated SoCs.

powell270
User Rank
Rookie
re: Freescale preps IoT attack with tiny MCU
powell270   3/7/2013 8:21:16 PM
NO RATINGS
Why 32 over 16 or 8 bit? Many reasons... First of all, ARM 32 bit cores scale well from small M-class up to high performance A-class - one can re-use applications written for M on higher performance cores when more performance is needed (i.e. moving from sensors more into the cloud for IOT). Another reason is that memory is costly and it "usually" requires fewer 32 bit instructions to accomplish a given task than if one used 8 or 16 bit instructions (ARM's M0/M0+, by the way uses the thumb (16 bit) instruction set)) thus requiring less memory for code storage. Performance is also typically improved using 32 bit devices (larger registers, greater addressing range). More power may be consumed switching 32 bit registers and supporting a 32bit pipe-line but, again, as fewer instructions may be executed compared to 8/16 bit, one is using more energy but over shorter time.

<<   <   Page 2 / 2
Flash Poll
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
EE Times editor Junko Yoshida grills two executives --Rick Walker, senior product marketing manager for IoT and home automation for CSR, and Jim Reich, CTO and co-founder at Palatehome.
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Top Comments of the Week