Breaking News
Design How-To

Company-provided training

3/1/2013 08:37 PM EST
2 comments
NO RATINGS
More Related Links
View Comments: Threaded | Newest First | Oldest First
Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
re: Company-provided training
Bert22306   3/2/2013 9:59:47 PM
NO RATINGS
See, here's the thing. My compoany does have their mandatory training, but like most mandated requirements, it's not usually what the engineers need. Company mandated courses are more generic, some mostly geared to "covering their corporate hind ends." Things like intellectual property, trade secrets, international regs on arms trade, that sort of thing, on a periodic basis. Necessary stuff, I suppose, but what is most important for engineers is to have instilled in them, back during undergraduate years, that it is their own responsibility to keep themselves educated and up to date. These days, that has become a lot easier to do than it was 40 years ago. This can be a combination of company subsidized courses, at the formal end of the spectrum, to individual engineers digging up reference material and putting in some serious study time. My company encourages this. I put much more importance on this type of training than I do the company-generic mandated stuff.

MClayton0
User Rank
CEO
re: Company-provided training
MClayton0   3/4/2013 7:42:44 PM
NO RATINGS
Will your company re-imburse "certifications" such as Project Mgmt or Six Sigma or Lean? Many do not, but hire to some extent based on such certifications. No easy answers. My opinion is that engineers should save 10% of their salary to apply toward future-proofing education in their current field or a new technology that is replacing that which they have mastered, and really do the work it takes to stay valuable.

August Cartoon Caption Winner!
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
"All the King's horses and all the KIng's men gave up on Humpty, so they handed the problem off to Engineering."
5 comments
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Flash Poll
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
David Patterson, known for his pioneering research that led to RAID, clusters and more, is part of a team at UC Berkeley that recently made its RISC-V processor architecture an open source hardware offering. We talk with Patterson and one of his colleagues behind the effort about the opportunities they see, what new kinds of designs they hope to enable and what it means for today’s commercial processor giants such as Intel, ARM and Imagination Technologies.