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Propeller beanie design problem: attaching the propeller to the motor

3/18/2013 03:27 PM EDT
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seaEE
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re: Propeller beanie design problem: attaching the propeller to the motor
seaEE   3/21/2013 3:10:06 AM
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Yikes! know? no? I need to proofread my messages and get an extra hour of sleep!

ai5ee
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re: Propeller beanie design problem: attaching the propeller to the motor
ai5ee   3/22/2013 9:35:11 PM
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I thought of making a powered propeller hat a few years ago. I wanted the propeller to turn slowly enough to be able to see the blades (2 or 3 revolutions per second or so). I programmed a PIC to PWM the motor, but I found that there were a bunch of things that affected the speed (temperature, humidity, battery voltage...) and since I was trying to run at the hairy edge, it just didn't work very well.

ai5ee
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re: Propeller beanie design problem: attaching the propeller to the motor
ai5ee   3/22/2013 9:36:04 PM
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I would go with magnets for mounting.

WKetel
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re: Propeller beanie design problem: attaching the propeller to the motor
WKetel   3/24/2013 2:40:33 AM
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Probably the simplest similar adapter would have been a piece of insulation from a chunk of number fourteen copper house-wiring cable. From each foot of wire you could produce about 36 of the 3/8 inch long adapters, and at about 90 cents a foot for the two conductor cable it would have been quite cheap. But those spacers are a more elegant way to do it.

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