Breaking News
Design How-To

Slideshow: Next ARM CEO's 10 toughest tasks

3/27/2013 01:31 PM EDT
9 comments
NO RATINGS
Page 1 / 10 Next >
More Related Links
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
mcgrathdylan
User Rank
Blogger
re: Slideshow: Next ARM CEO's 10 toughest tasks
mcgrathdylan   4/1/2013 4:55:25 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for pointing out this error. We've added the missing page back in.

Robotics Developer
User Rank
Rookie
re: Slideshow: Next ARM CEO's 10 toughest tasks
Robotics Developer   3/29/2013 4:05:01 PM
NO RATINGS
A very interesting article but I kept wondering about the pictures in the "slide show". How did most of these relate to the paragraph above them? Did I miss something or is my web viewer not working for some reason? Also, I was looking for 10 and not 9 "slides" but did not see that either.

wayne12345
User Rank
Rookie
re: Slideshow: Next ARM CEO's 10 toughest tasks
wayne12345   3/28/2013 6:49:28 PM
NO RATINGS
I see 9. What is 10th?

joe.raffa
User Rank
Rookie
re: Slideshow: Next ARM CEO's 10 toughest tasks
joe.raffa   3/28/2013 3:41:35 PM
NO RATINGS
Beyond wireless, I see Imagination being very aggressive in general in IP acquisition. I think they are in a position to be disruptive.

licence
User Rank
Rookie
re: Slideshow: Next ARM CEO's 10 toughest tasks
licence   3/28/2013 9:46:26 AM
NO RATINGS
Correction : "... 2012 120m.." "...2012 over 150m"

licence
User Rank
Rookie
re: Slideshow: Next ARM CEO's 10 toughest tasks
licence   3/28/2013 9:45:05 AM
NO RATINGS
I think you need to read the ARM 2012 Annual Report (see ARM's website) rather than guessing To quote "We have also seen the penetration of Mali, ARM's graphics processor, grow to more than 20% of Android smartphones and over 50% of Android tablets worldwide" Mali is growing fast for them in terms of licences and shipment. In 2011 there were 50m units shipped, 2012 120m and the forecast for 2013 is 240m. http://www.tgdaily.com/hardware-features/69743-arms-mali-gpu-is-number-one-in-android-tablet-market Given you are unlikely to know the R&D spend or the licensing and royalty revenues generated I suspect you have very little data on which to define it as a "commercial failure". And that would assume, wrongly, that R&D spend on something like Mali can be judged a commercial failure over such a short space of time. The R&D on Mali, just on the designs already announced, will be generating revenues for ARM for many, many years to come. It's how the business model works

tangey
User Rank
Rookie
re: Slideshow: Next ARM CEO's 10 toughest tasks
tangey   3/27/2013 5:24:16 PM
NO RATINGS
"This has become the successful Mali GPU core range, second in the market place to Imagination's PowerVR line." Successful...hmmm, they have certainly had some low end chinese design wins, but other than Samsung, they don't have a tier 1, and even samsung has diluted with them preferring imagination for their flashship Exynos octacore. Given that their shipped volume of graphics IP is much less than 1/2 of imaginations, and their published royalty rate is around 4.5c for graphics cores compared with of IMG's average of 25c, I would suggest that todate its graphics dept has been a complete commerical failure relative to the R&D spend.

rick merritt
User Rank
Author
re: Slideshow: Next ARM CEO's 10 toughest tasks
rick merritt   3/27/2013 2:45:14 PM
NO RATINGS
Just heard an Imagination keynote yesterday. I did not know that RF IP is another big area for them along with graphics and now MIPS. Is ARM armed for the wireless battle?

August Cartoon Caption Winner!
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
"All the King's horses and all the KIng's men gave up on Humpty, so they handed the problem off to Engineering."
5 comments
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Flash Poll
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
David Patterson, known for his pioneering research that led to RAID, clusters and more, is part of a team at UC Berkeley that recently made its RISC-V processor architecture an open source hardware offering. We talk with Patterson and one of his colleagues behind the effort about the opportunities they see, what new kinds of designs they hope to enable and what it means for today’s commercial processor giants such as Intel, ARM and Imagination Technologies.