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NXP buys MCU tools vendor for software future

5/3/2013 03:15 PM EDT
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lynchzilla
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re: NXP buys MCU tools vendor for software future
lynchzilla   5/8/2013 6:42:13 PM
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True,,CooCox defaults to C language and won't compile *.cpp files. However, a poster to the TO Stellaris support forum outlined the steps to modify CooCox to build C++ projects. Here is the link: http://e2e.ti.com/support/microcontrollers/stellaris_arm/f/471/t/235680.aspx CooCox does use the ARM-maintained open source GNU compiler toolchain that you recommend. I am just disappointed that someone would actually charge $1000 for a tool chain that is built from mostly open-source components.

Peter Clarke
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re: NXP buys MCU tools vendor for software future
Peter Clarke   5/8/2013 12:10:47 PM
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Possibly. Certainly Freescale bought Metroworks a while back. And ARM bought Kiel. There seems to be a trend towards MCU vendors buying software development tool providers. IAR remains independent

Ewout206
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re: NXP buys MCU tools vendor for software future
Ewout206   5/8/2013 7:43:54 AM
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That is all true, but CooCox doesn't support C++ either. If you want to use C++ (and who doesn't with 1 MByte of Flash at your disposal....) you are on your own. ARM itself has an excellent package (https://launchpad.net/gcc-arm-embedded) which, contrary to Codesourcery or CooCox, does support C++ and FPU instructions for the Cortex-M4 core, inaddition to supporting M0-M3 and R4.

lynchzilla
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re: NXP buys MCU tools vendor for software future
lynchzilla   5/6/2013 5:32:46 PM
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Downloaded the LPCXpresso tool chain last week and had a look. It's the GNU toolchain, Eclipse IDE, GNU GDB debugger, probably the GNUARM managed make plug-in, and somebody's JTAG driver. Setting up such a thing by yourself is a daunting task so having somebody figure out all the details is worth something. However, the free download does not support C++ and you are limited in the size of your flash executable file to only 128k. The stock lpc1769 has 512k of flash. To upgrade to an unlimited flash download, they want $999. That cuts out students and Maker devotees. There is a similar solution from a Chinese group (CooCox) that uses the same open-source software parts with no restrictions and the development package is free.

jdfidus
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re: NXP buys MCU tools vendor for software future
jdfidus   5/6/2013 3:12:38 PM
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Didn't the same happen with the software tools house Microchip bought a few years back?

resistion
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re: NXP buys MCU tools vendor for software future
resistion   5/4/2013 11:18:31 PM
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Seems this software player only lasted 7 years and non-NXP customers if any took indefinite software continuity for granted.

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