Breaking News
Product How-To

Intel previews server and Thunderbolt chips

Thunderbolt edges toward pro markets
4/10/2013 01:00 AM EDT
4 comments
NO RATINGS
< Previous Page 2 / 2
More Related Links
View Comments: Threaded | Newest First | Oldest First
kjdsfkjdshfkdshfvc
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel previews server and Thunderbolt chips
kjdsfkjdshfkdshfvc   4/12/2013 3:38:48 PM
NO RATINGS
Cool stuff. http://bit.ly/IC4m9t

TarraTarra!
User Rank
CEO
re: Intel previews server and Thunderbolt chips
TarraTarra!   4/13/2013 5:16:24 AM
NO RATINGS
It is interesting that the new E3 power ranges from 17W, 45W to 87W. They must be really hand-picking the 17W parts because the true power seems to be in the 60W range. Wonder how much yield they can get for the low power part.

jaybus0
User Rank
CEO
re: Intel previews server and Thunderbolt chips
jaybus0   4/13/2013 2:49:33 PM
NO RATINGS
The current one is 17W. The new one is down to 13W. More interesting will be the E5 10 core chips at 70W. It will be possible to get 4 of these in a 1U chassis. That's 40 2.5+ GHz cores, 80 hyper-threads, with at least Ivy Bridge performance levels, and at least half a TB of DRAM in a 1U. It is interesting. It is not clear to me that the ARM and Atom server chips will win here. Better performance per Watt is important, but only as long as it can maintain the same or better performance per volume unit. If a 2U space of ARM or Atom chips is needed to run as many VMs as a 1U of E5s, then which really costs less?

resistion
User Rank
CEO
re: Intel previews server and Thunderbolt chips
resistion   4/13/2013 3:23:14 PM
NO RATINGS
The lowest TDP Sandy bridge and corresponding performance is about same as lowest TDP of haswell and its corresponding performance. It can be found in published data that the 22 nm finfet transition took more of a performance hit in order to reduce power.

Top Comments of the Week
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
"All the King's horses and all the KIng's men gave up on Humpty, so they handed the problem off to Engineering."
5 comments
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
David Patterson, known for his pioneering research that led to RAID, clusters and more, is part of a team at UC Berkeley that recently made its RISC-V processor architecture an open source hardware offering. We talk with Patterson and one of his colleagues behind the effort about the opportunities they see, what new kinds of designs they hope to enable and what it means for today’s commercial processor giants such as Intel, ARM and Imagination Technologies.
Flash Poll