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Are 18 and 20 bits now the new 16 bits?

3/13/2010 05:00 PM EST
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bcarso
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re: Are 18 and 20 bits now the new 16 bits?
bcarso   3/17/2010 4:24:09 PM
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I laughed at your typo Bill, as I can well imagine a conversation with the redoubtable Williams to become a "conversion". Indeed, that app note has been a highlight of recent days. I mentioned to my friend Samuel Groner that I hesitated to forward it to some audiophile friends, as they might seize on the losses in Teflon cable (air line "non-negotiable") to prove that they can hear cable differences at audio frequencies. When I worked on scientific instrumentation I had occasion to address some similar settling-time issues, and devised a bunch of special fixtures for what was then the state-of-the-art amplifiers and pulse generators. Very nostalgic to recall, as I've had far more prosaic things to do since! Brad

ChrisGammell
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re: Are 18 and 20 bits now the new 16 bits?
ChrisGammell   3/17/2010 12:56:09 PM
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ha, clicked too soon. The last part of that last sentence should read: ...or Jim Williams.

ChrisGammell
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re: Are 18 and 20 bits now the new 16 bits?
ChrisGammell   3/17/2010 12:55:37 PM
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I'm glad you pointed out that App Note from Jim. It was also published in the first March issue of EDN I believe. Even though I know there is a lot of behind the scenes work for his articles, I'm always flabbergasted at how he knows to add a circuit here and there to correct for certain issues. Another relevant JW article for DACs is his recent one on measuring 775 nV noise on voltage references. Mucho impressive. In terms of measuring the measurers, usually the answer involves ridiculously cutting edge and expensive equipment (but who tests that??), a staff of metrology engineers

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