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Numonyx launches serial-interface phase-change memory

4/20/2010 11:00 PM EDT
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unknown multiplier
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re: Numonyx launches serial-interface phase-change memory
unknown multiplier   7/25/2010 2:44:10 AM
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Wonder if like mram it will find a niche rather than go mainstream fully displacing flash and dram.

DrFPGA
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re: Numonyx launches serial-interface phase-change memory
DrFPGA   7/24/2010 4:45:51 PM
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It would be great if PCM could go main stream. Seems to have some nice advantages.Check out this related article on a potential show stopper for the technology however- current density requirements go up linearly as lithography scales down. Can become a brick wall... http://www.eetimes.com/electronics-news/4088579/Numonyx-set-to-discuss-potential-PCM-showstopper-

Volatile Memory
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re: Numonyx launches serial-interface phase-change memory
Volatile Memory   4/21/2010 5:22:35 PM
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Peter, two more things. You claim that "the write endurance has been increased by a factor of ten to 1 million cycles" compared to the 2008 product. That may be a lie. Take a look at page 5 of the "old" datasheet for P8P: http://www.numonyx.com/en-US/MemoryProducts/PCM/EAP/Documents/P8P_DS-Rev5.pdf There it says that they "changed the Writing Endurance to 100,000" in February of 2009 (not in 2008!), presumably down from 1,000,000. Also, take a look at the write speed (page 70 in the "old" datasheet and page 71 in the "new" one). Note max buffer write speeds (legacy and 1s): Old legacy: 64 bytes in 180 microseconds New legacy: 64 bytes in 360 microseconds Old 1s: 64 bytes in 128 microseconds New 1s: 64 bytes in 280 microseconds So, apparently, P8P can be as slow as 0.2 megabytes/s write, even in buffer programming mode (compare to 1-2 megabytes per second for modern NOR) With every year, PCM is getting slower, apparently!

Volatile Memory
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re: Numonyx launches serial-interface phase-change memory
Volatile Memory   4/21/2010 2:44:19 PM
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Oh, I see: http://www.eetimes.com/news/semi/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=224500085

Volatile Memory
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re: Numonyx launches serial-interface phase-change memory
Volatile Memory   4/21/2010 1:38:25 PM
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No, Peter! Read your own writing: http://www.eetimes.com/212501436 "Non-volatile memory supplier Numonyx BV (Geneva, Switzerland) has started the commercial supply of its 'Alverstone' 128-Mbit phase-change memory to selected customers in the embedded sector, the company said Friday (Dec. 19). " You wrote than in 2008. It was not just "sampling." Either Numonyx lied in 2008 or is lying now. And, of course, the "300 times faster write speeds and ten times more write endurance than today's flash memory" is totally bogus. The datasheet clearly states that write speed is less than 1 megabyte/second (possibly as low as 0.3 megabyte/second) while modern NOR can write up to 2 megabytes per second, and endurance is minimal under high temperatures, as you note. This is a transparent attempt by Numonyx to divert attention from its dismal failure to deliver the 1Gbit 45nm PCM sample promised for Q1 of 2010: http://eetimes.com/news/latest/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=222001058 The fact is, no commercial product on the market today uses any of Numonyx's PCM chips. No set-top box, no "telecom," no smart meter. For obvious reasons - PCM is inferior to Flash in terms of density, cost, write speed, and high temperature endurance. Period.

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