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Open source compiler speeds code execution in LabVIEW 2010

8/2/2010 07:50 AM EDT
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K1200LT Rider
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re: Open source compiler speeds code execution in LabVIEW 2010
K1200LT Rider   8/5/2010 1:01:52 PM
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I would really like to see the FPGA capability opened up so that LabVIEW FPGA will work with ANY board containing a Xilinx FPGA. I could have really used it with the current project I'm on, but we're not going to buy the NI FPGA hardware to accomplish the relatively simple signal generation I'm needing for our test stations. I'm using $79 boards from Digilent for that. So, that forces me into doing low-level HDL coding. But, it's not all bad since it forces me to learn the language and low-level processes (which I've never done before).

Charles.Desassure
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re: Open source compiler speeds code execution in LabVIEW 2010
Charles.Desassure   8/4/2010 10:16:16 PM
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National Instruments today announced LabVIEW 2010, the latest version of the graphical programming environment for design, test, measurement and control applications. This is great news for this company! If National Instruments want to really take off, it is recommended that management offer discounts to institutions of high education (since enrollment is up around the US) to use within programming classes. This sounds like one of National Instruments best product.

goafrit
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re: Open source compiler speeds code execution in LabVIEW 2010
goafrit   8/4/2010 3:15:24 AM
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I find good use of Mathworks, but in most cases, you notice that you need LabView. But it all works out when these behemoth and dominant players in their sectors have to compete for my attention. It helps price. The whole concept of open source is great, but I always find out that the best of open source does not come free. Ask the people that support Linux and allow IBM to make billion dollar profits out of that.

Bob Lacovara
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re: Open source compiler speeds code execution in LabVIEW 2010
Bob Lacovara   8/2/2010 7:23:05 PM
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I tend to use LabView when connections to breadboards or lab instruments are a priority. LabView makes it pretty easy to get up and going. I use MATLAB as a sort of FORTRAN on steroids, if I want to do an analysis suited to procedural code. I would also use Simulink if simulation is required. LabView can certainly do a lot of simulation; MATLAB and Simulink can be connected to hardware. Both will drop C-code. But my "division of labor" is much as I first stated. My typical projects are designing nondestructive ultrasonic testers, so controlling our own hardware and instruments is easiest with LabView. But I will often do the initial signal analysis in MATLAB, with a drop into Simulink for any simulation. If needed, I run both tools together, but that's usually overkill: I'm just being lazy, not translating something from the one to the other. If your project is very large, and you need to do hardware and software co-design, particularly with plants with mechanical components, then Simulink will do it. I don't have experience (yet) with LabView on larger co-design situations, but it seems that LabView has many of the features needed for large-scale architecture.

nicolas.mokhoff
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re: Open source compiler speeds code execution in LabVIEW 2010
nicolas.mokhoff   8/2/2010 5:58:04 PM
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Bob: maybe you can elaborate on the nuanced differences. For instance, are certain applications better suited using NI tools and others using MathWorks tools; or is it a performance issue across most applications. Where do you use the NI tools and where the MathWorks tools?

Bob Lacovara
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re: Open source compiler speeds code execution in LabVIEW 2010
Bob Lacovara   8/2/2010 2:27:51 PM
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It's rather fun to watch two behemoths, National Instruments and The Mathworks, position their products. You get the impression that they are motivated by two things at least: useful extension of their products' capabilities, and cutting into their competitor's market. (Profit, of course, goes without saying.) Both are good things. However, the application domain for these two companies overlaps: hence you see the curious relationship between the two: sometimes cooperative, sometimes competitive. It's fun to watch, and the result is a win-win for the user: each product becomes better for the competition. (For the record, I was a Mathworks employee for a short period, and I use both products constantly.)

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