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World’s fastest 80C51 CPU @ CeBIT

2/23/2012 04:34 PM EST
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Code Monkey
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re: World’s fastest 80C51 CPU @ CeBIT
Code Monkey   2/28/2012 4:58:56 PM
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There is a vast tool ecosystem for 8051s and the instruction set is unencumbered by patents. Chip companies don't like royalties so they will plop down an 8051 core if a speed demon isn't required. It sounds like the DQ80251 is designed for DCD's licensees to use with their other IP cores in their SoCs.

srm_creator
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re: World’s fastest 80C51 CPU @ CeBIT
srm_creator   2/28/2012 3:28:21 PM
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Can not believe this! With so many variations of 8-bit, 16-bit and 32-bit MCUs out there, why would anyone need a "fast" 80C51 MCU? Then, what about software tools for it? Are there fancy new code development tools for that "fastest 80C51? How about an emulator system for it? Last but not least, where would they find code developers for it? What would they tell a potential end user: "the projected life time of this new design using the fastest 80C51 is about 2 years, maybe 1 year!

cpns
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re: World’s fastest 80C51 CPU @ CeBIT
cpns   2/28/2012 9:57:51 AM
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The "point" was that you could then have a 64Kb addressable memory space - not available in "on-chip" memory of the day. 20 years ago worked on a 8031 based product that used a third port to page in memory banks to give up to 16Mb of storage. It was used to address a "huge" (and heavy) array of 32x28pin ceramic DIP flash chips for a digital audio announcing system for trains. With the advent of multi Gb iPod and MP3 players it all looks rather antique! The encoding required 4Kb of data for one second of speech-band audio; the 8031 would not have been capable of real-time decompression even if the algorithms existed.

David Ashton
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re: World’s fastest 80C51 CPU @ CeBIT
David Ashton   2/28/2012 8:25:20 AM
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The 8051 has come a long way as you say. I still have a bunch of old Intel 8031's in my drawer. These were "Romless" 8051s, where you used 2 of the ports as data/low address and high address for an EPROM. Leaving only two ports to actually use. Seemed a little pointless. Thank goodness for the Flash memory that MCUs have now.

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