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Lattice's programmable Power Manager solutions in SSDs

6/11/2012 04:28 PM EDT
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I_B_GREEN
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re: Lattice's programmable Power Manager solutions in SSDs
I_B_GREEN   6/13/2012 9:04:56 PM
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No question was possed just a new solution beyond what your chip does.(at least in the diagram shown) You must protect the gate voltage with shunt element, because the voltage created across the series resitor subtracts from the gate voltage pinching off the fet on transients and inrush via current across series resitor with storage cap.

brianlk
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re: Lattice's programmable Power Manager solutions in SSDs
brianlk   6/13/2012 7:45:46 PM
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Dear Mr. Green, Thank you for the feedback. The hot swap get gate is controlled by the on chip charge pump. The charge pump voltage is always higher than capacitor voltage +vgs. Please,ease let me know if I answered your question --Shyam

I_B_GREEN
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re: Lattice's programmable Power Manager solutions in SSDs
I_B_GREEN   6/13/2012 4:02:58 PM
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I designed this in descrete form it is flying on the 787 dreamliner. Inrush limiting, pulse/EMI rejection, but the design is missing one thing, the fet reference needs to be at the cap input.

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