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28KB Java virtual machine supports 32-bit MCUs

11/5/2012 09:05 PM EST
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Max The Magnificent
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re: 28KB Java virtual machine supports 32-bit MCUs
Max The Magnificent   11/5/2012 9:20:23 PM
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So, is there any reason this virtual machine couldn't run on FPGA-based Cortex-M hard and/or soft processors?

Regis Latawiec
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re: 28KB Java virtual machine supports 32-bit MCUs
Regis Latawiec   11/6/2012 10:48:32 AM
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Hi Max. Yes, the MicroJvm can run on any ARM Cortex-M implementation. No limitation due to FPGA.

cdhmanning
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re: 28KB Java virtual machine supports 32-bit MCUs
cdhmanning   11/6/2012 8:40:27 PM
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This is certainly not the industry's first small JVM. Lejos has been doing this for ages: http://lejos.sourceforge.net/ Lejos is about the same size on ARM. Lejos has been running on ARM micros for almost 6 years and on H8 for much longer than that.

Duane Benson
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re: 28KB Java virtual machine supports 32-bit MCUs
Duane Benson   11/7/2012 4:41:08 AM
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I'm not a big fan of Java. The promise has always been great, but it always seems like the reality falls a bit short. Of course, I've only used Java as an applications platform, not as a development platform or as an embedded OS. But ignoring my opinions, I wouldn't think that running this on a Zynq would be out of the question. I would think that a FPGA based ARM (hard or soft) would be an ideal use for a JVM like this.

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