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Code Red Technologies acquired by NXP

5/1/2013 02:52 PM EDT
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Alxx123
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re: Code Red Technologies acquired by NXP
Alxx123   5/8/2013 2:23:25 AM
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Lets hope they open up the spec for the debug/programming on the nxp expresso boards so they can work properly. Or is nxp just going to abandon support for all those products ? Its a real shame that you have to cutoff the program /debug part of these boards and use a third party programmer to be able to use them properly.

JeffL_2
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re: Code Red Technologies acquired by NXP
JeffL_2   5/2/2013 3:56:52 PM
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So I guess you can use these tools to develop for "any" NXP series LPC microcontroller? Oops, the LPC9xx is 8051-based? Well let's just "forget that mistake", besides there's plenty of tools someone can find to develop for that family, no real "support" of course though...actually some of those parts had some real good ideas, like giving you the ability to programmably "steal" the DAC out of the ADC subsystem and generate a direct output that changes quite quickly. How many other MCUs do you know of that offer a direct DAC analog output? Oh that's right you're SUPPOSED to use PWM, you don't get to choose a DAC because our focus groups told us YOU DON'T WANT THEM. Sounds like a marketing organization with a large and growing "blind spot" but I guess you don't get downgraded from being Philips Semiconductor without making a few screwups...

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