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DRAM Prices Improving Rapidly

7/16/2013 08:05 PM EDT
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X-REL Emmanuel
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October 2013?
X-REL Emmanuel   7/17/2013 3:51:06 AM
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"is now at levels last seen in October 2013"

Am I seriously badly waked up this morning or is this article from the future?

JanineLove
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Another death knell for the PC?
JanineLove   7/17/2013 9:25:24 AM
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"DRAM suppliers have scaled back their output of lower-priced commodity PC DRAM and transitioned to higher-priced, low-power, mobile DRAM." Yet another death knell for the PC?

JanineLove
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Re: Another death knell for the PC?
JanineLove   7/17/2013 9:34:40 AM
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Here's some more insight on mobile memory from elsewhere on the EET site: Industry View: Doug Wong of Toshiba on the Future of Memory

Max The Magnificent
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Re: October 2013?
Max The Magnificent   7/17/2013 9:44:25 AM
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@X-REL Emmanuel: ...or is this article from the future?


Someone obviously slipped up here ... there is a directive at EE Times that nobody should post articles from the future, because this would reveal our awesome power ... now we will have to make you "dissapear" in this timeline (sorry :-)

mcgrathdylan
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Re: October 2013?
mcgrathdylan   7/17/2013 2:03:37 PM
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Yes. The article is from the future.

 

My mistake, which has now been corrected. Thanks for pointing out my error (and for having such a good time with it).

Max The Magnificent
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Re: October 2013?
Max The Magnificent   7/17/2013 2:06:43 PM
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@mcgrathsylan: Yes. The article is from the future.

 

I just feel sorry for poor old "X-REL Emmanuel" who has now been deleted from this timeline. I wonder what his/her replacement will be like (hopefully not quite so observant :-)

strategy1
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ASP question
strategy1   7/17/2013 9:00:31 PM
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Can you clarify if this is ASP/Gb or ASP/2Gb? Also, is this SPOT or Contract and Commodity or mobile  or some blended average?

 

Thanks

bmccleanicinsights
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Re: ASP question
bmccleanicinsights   7/18/2013 1:18:47 PM
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The historical ASPs are from WSTS which is takes the total DRAM market divided by total DRAM units shipped, so essentially it is a blend of all DRAM densities.  The DRAM sales and unit shipment data comes from DRAM suppliers so it is really contract pricing and not spot market pricing.

strategy1
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Re: ASP question
strategy1   7/18/2013 1:45:05 PM
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Thanks Bill for your reply.

 

So it is not per Gb or something as we see in standard  market research reports.  Still, the trend you captured is impressive.  Wonder if the oligopoly will lead to profitable DRAM business for years to come!!

bmccleanicinsights
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Re: ASP question
bmccleanicinsights   7/18/2013 1:53:54 PM
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It usually works that way (e.g., Intel never lost money, even in downturns, as it dominated the MPU marketplace).  With no new startups entering the DRAM field to crash prices and go after marketshare, at least the leaders in DRAM (Samsung, Hynix, and Micron) should be able to make some money now.  It really has been a long time coming!

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