Design Con 2015
Breaking News
News & Analysis

Graphene Said to Pose Health Hazard

7/18/2013 04:00 PM EDT
25 comments
NO RATINGS
More Related Links
View Comments: Oldest First | Newest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 3   >   >>
chanj0
User Rank
CEO
The future of Graphene
chanj0   7/19/2013 2:39:56 PM
NO RATINGS
On one hands, there are so many position result of graphene research. Here comes one of them, http://www.techgig.com/tech-news/editors-pick/Graphene-may-boost-internet-speed-100-times-Study-18884


On the other hands, there are potential hazard of the material. There seems to be a long way to walk to make graphene-based device.

Thanks for the hardwork of the researchers and thanks for the info.

chrisnfolsom
User Rank
Manager
Re: A graphene ban?
chrisnfolsom   7/19/2013 3:44:59 PM
NO RATINGS
Thank you - it's hard to know how materials might affect us as there are so many threats short/long term - we have natural Asbestos in my area, and those prions from BSE and others scare the hell out of me.

Reg the Graphene - is it handled at all in a cell, or does it kill the cell, would the body remove the dead cell with the graphene in it - did I miss that in the article?

If graphine was made without the sharp edges could it be worn or broken/ablated, degraded by U/V or some other process to allow those edges to be recreated?

Whenever I hear about these new materials I alway am reminded of the Ringworld Series of books by Larry Niven.

mcgrathdylan
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A graphene ban?
mcgrathdylan   7/19/2013 6:38:30 PM
NO RATINGS
Is it possible to do that? To come up with better ways of making graphene that can elminate the toxicity identified by the Brown researchers?

R_Colin_Johnson
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A graphene ban?
R_Colin_Johnson   7/19/2013 7:36:48 PM
NO RATINGS
The toxicity will mostly jeopardize the workers handling the powders, which for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) would be the fab workers in the bunny suits. Once the graphene is fixed in place with CVD on a substrate it should be safe--until the chips end of life when it comes apart in the landfill.

Etmax
User Rank
Rookie
Re: A graphene ban?
Etmax   7/20/2013 6:52:28 AM
NO RATINGS
I'm not sure Graphene's toxicity matters when a finished product it used internally, A device using graphene transistor equivalents will be bonded to a package's leadframe and encapsulated in a resin then mounted to a circuit board and then placed in an enclosure made of biocompatible plastics or titanium with a battery. That will then be placed in the body. It really is only the manufacturing processes and maybe the disposal methods that will be at issue. Disposal may be incineration so won't be a problem.

I did some work that required epoxy potting and we used silica powder as a stabiliser and economy filler and that is dangerous because the dust particles are so fine that they penetrate deep into the lungs. We used dust masks and fans for safety. Once potted there was no risk.


Even modern diesel engines make nanoscale particles of carbon compared to the 15-40um particles of older diesels. It's so fine that there's talk of lung cancer being an issue because it penetrates so deeply into the lungs.


So really what I'm saying is it's only when the materials are freely available as a nanoscale particle that they represent a risk, packaged parts really have no issue.

Look even at Beryllium oxide, used as a die insulator in RF transistors, yet extremely toxic.

Tom Murphy
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A graphene ban?
Tom Murphy   7/20/2013 7:29:58 PM
NO RATINGS
I think we're way past the time when the eletronics industry should face the same requirement as, say, the tire industry: provide money to dispose of products at the end of their lives, just as we're charged a federal tax on tires to help pay for their disposal.  We just can use stuff and dump it after each product cycle -- it' s suicide.

Do you think it would be reasonable to have a 0.5 percent excise tax on all electronics to help pay for their safe disposal when their lie is over?

Peter Clarke
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A graphene ban?
Peter Clarke   7/20/2013 10:32:54 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree that a disposal levy is a good idea. I wonder how it would work if users were also allowed to mail back unwanted goods to the original vendor at the vendor's expense. I suspect that would produce a different design behaviour and focus on recyclability of materials at the company. However because companies go bust, get bought this has to operate alongside a levy to pay for cases where there is no one to send the goods to.

Tom Murphy
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A graphene ban?
Tom Murphy   7/20/2013 10:37:51 PM
NO RATINGS
Good point, Peter.  You know HP and some other companies provide "return" boxes with cartridges for large office printers.   I think that makes sense in that kind of situation. HP actually refills those, and sell them again, like Coke used to do with soda bottles.

But you're right, companies come and go.  So I think there should be recycling stations where you can drop of used electronics. This is getting to be a cottage industry in many areas now, because some business owners realized they can make a buck off it.  I'd like to see a more organized effort where consumers would receive an incentive to turn in used goods, and retailers would profit from turning them over to a recycler.

Honestly, I wouldn't mind paying a small levy if it helped keep my toxic junk out of a landfill.

Peter Clarke
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A graphene ban?
Peter Clarke   7/20/2013 11:11:03 PM
NO RATINGS
As you are probably aware in Europe we have regulations on recycling of electrical and electronics equipent (WEEE) and high charges for landfill to try and drive recycling.


However, the high cost of responsible recycling in Europe has contributed to the phenomenon of "off-shoring" of electronic disposal with containers of waste equipment being shipped around the globe to such places as Nigeria, India and China.....where unregulated "recycling" of hazardous materials has been done in very hazardous conditions. At the same time some unscrupulous people try to "mine" for valuable western bank account details on the disk drives of these broken PCs.

Just as we increasingly shred paper documents from banks etc to try and protect our online identities it is become increasingly important to put a hammer through any disk drives that may contain sensitive information because who knows who will be assessing it once you throw the equipment out.

While there has been some focus on work practices during the making of consumer electronics (in China and elsewhere) there also needs to an emphasis on the end-of-life processes.

 

 

tb100
User Rank
CEO
Re: A graphene ban?
tb100   7/22/2013 12:33:45 PM
NO RATINGS
"Even modern diesel engines make nanoscale particles of carbon compared to the 15-40um particles of older diesels. It's so fine that there's talk of lung cancer being an issue because it penetrates so deeply into the lungs. "

This the first I've heard of modern diesel engines putting out nanoscale carbon particles. Do you have a link to anything that talks about this?

<<   <   Page 2 / 3   >   >>
Most Recent Comments
BinaryJudy
 
gilvanlatreille
 
alex_m1
 
David Ashton
 
junko.yoshida
 
AZskibum
 
Stargzer
 
junko.yoshida
 
Stargzer
Radio
NEXT UPCOMING BROADCAST
EE Times Senior Technical Editor Martin Rowe will interview EMC engineer Kenneth Wyatt.
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Flash Poll