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Slideshow: Facebook Calls for Cold Flash

8/15/2013 08:15 AM EDT
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rick merritt
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rick merritt   8/15/2013 12:36:35 PM
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Would you make or use the kind of cold stoage chips Facebook wants?

Any insights you see from Facebook's latest look into its data center?

chanj0
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Lowering DB?
chanj0   8/15/2013 1:50:08 PM
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Slide 5: "By increasing flash use in the last two years, Facebook has lowered both latency and the number of databases it needs to support."


I can see improvement of latency. I am not sure I understand how flash can help reduce the number of databases. Any insights?

Sheetal.Pandey
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Sheetal.Pandey   8/15/2013 2:21:07 PM
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Wow thats so much of business of flash industry. But havent they talking for customized solutions?

rick merritt
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Re: Lowering DB?
rick merritt   8/15/2013 6:17:58 PM
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Hi Chan: I think Fbook is using increasing density of flash to pack more of the relatively small usewr databases (cookie level stuff) into fewer files packed closer to processors that previously

resistion
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resistion   8/16/2013 1:47:06 AM
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I think what they want is OTP not flash.

elctrnx_lyf
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elctrnx_lyf   8/16/2013 6:23:35 AM
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The social community and photo sharing websites seem to drive the entire storage industry in new direction. Will it have major impact on the computer users in future.

Ron Neale
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Ron Neale   8/16/2013 7:32:44 AM
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Resistron: Touch of the PCM deja vus here. In the very early days of phase change memory PCM it was called RMM for Read Mostly Memory. Mostly because of the limited write/erase life that could be guaranteed at that time. Maybe there is still hope! The problem with this request is if if you ask for junk you get junk and then even worse junk. In the end you finish up with what is virtual memory you just kid the users that they are putting the photgraphs that they will never look at into memory but there is nothing there. Esapecially nice if you can charge for it.

 

 

rick merritt
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rick merritt   8/16/2013 11:29:32 AM
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@Ron: I also wonder what's the incentive for flash vendors to make a cheaper product at a time when there is such demand for a relatively high value version of flash. It must be easy to say you will get back to them when you aren't quitre so busy.

anon9303122
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Re: Reactions and RMM
anon9303122   8/16/2013 11:34:01 AM
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Since the members get to use the service free of charge (advertisements not withstanding), how can they complain if Facebook accidentally loses their pictures?  Of course, some slimey lawyer will try to make a federal case out of it.  I think Facebook got it right.

jaybus0
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Re: Lowering DB?
jaybus0   8/16/2013 11:56:18 AM
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chanj0...... large RAM cache is needed to keep a db on hard drive within tolerable performance levels, particularly for write operations, because of the very slow random i/o speeds of hard drives. Because flash has much faster random i/o than hard dive, it is possible to have larger databases with a given amount of RAM. 

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