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Indian Startup Uses Imagination for Wearable SoC

9/2/2013 10:30 AM EDT
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Sheetal.Pandey
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indian startup for wearable soc
Sheetal.Pandey   9/3/2013 7:10:21 AM
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Looks the startup has all it takes to survive ,be focussed and become profitable. Hyderabad in india also has good soc designers and very cost effective manpower. But indians in top management of a startup has positive and not so positive effedcts when it comes to mergers,acquisitions and partnership models. But let's hope industry has something thoughtful and innovative in future. Good luck.

rick merritt
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Very interesting
rick merritt   9/3/2013 10:28:11 AM
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Cool crew trying to leap to the next big thing. Sorry I could not make the Sili Valley event where they made a debut!

Caleb Kraft
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wearable is the next big thing.
Caleb Kraft   9/3/2013 10:58:22 AM
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I'm really curious to see what they put out. It seems like after years and years of wearable devices being the "next big thing", we might be seeing a drastic rise. Then again, our cell phones are filling the niche that many expected from wearables.

Peter Clarke
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Re: wearable is the next big thing.
Peter Clarke   9/3/2013 11:14:47 AM
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The approach that has been standard for a few years now is to either write an application that can be hosted on the smartphone OR, if additional hardware is required, put it in a separate unit that links to the mobile phone via Bluetooth.

In this way new applications can piggyback off the reasonable chance that users will have a phone with Bluetooth that can connect you back to the Internet.

The downside is that the wearable product (various counters and meters for medical, sports, wellness) must rely on the ability of users to turn on and use the Bluetooth attributes of their phone....and it may require a separate piece of software on the phone to collate data and upload.

By the time you have split and complicated your product this way you can turn off a lot of consumers.

What this product may address is the desirabiity to have the wearable satellite equipment as power-efficient as possible so that charging it can be kept to a minimum or may even allow energy harvesting from movement.

eewiz
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Re: wearable is the next big thing.
eewiz   9/4/2013 10:45:26 AM
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ARM CPUs would have been a better choice, considering the eco system.

 

"What this product may address is the desirabiity to have the wearable satellite equipment as power-efficient as possible so that charging it can be kept to a minimum or may even allow energy harvesting from movement."

 

Even then you might need to connect the device to the cloud to accumulate the data.. ie still needs a bluetooth/wifi connection?

Peter Clarke
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Re: wearable is the next big thing.
Peter Clarke   9/4/2013 11:13:15 AM
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@eewiz

What we don't know is how much Ineda is paying to use MIPS, or is being paid to use MIPS?

If Imagination is willing to cut a great deal to get you to use MIPS and be a poster boy/girl for ultra low power maybe it is the way to go. Especially if you think the real power saving is going to come in the rest of the circuit and how you write the sofware.

Peter Clarke
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Re: wearable is the next big thing.
Peter Clarke   9/4/2013 11:16:26 AM
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@eewiz

Also Imagintation/MIPS will probably give you great support while ARM is very busy and may even have been slow in getting in to pitch their cores to Ineda.

Certainly Sanjay Jha and Lip Bu-Tan know ARM well. 

 

rick merritt
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Re: wearable is the next big thing.
rick merritt   9/3/2013 4:48:42 PM
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@Caleb: I agree. I wroyte about wearbales a deacde ago...but at some point the someday tech becomes a today tech.

I'm watching for the Galaxy Gear news tomorrow. I am told Samsung is packing GPS, cmaera and more into a watch. We shall see.

krisi
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imagination
krisi   9/3/2013 11:46:38 AM
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Imagination Technology is used more often it seems....what is their advantage over ARM?

Peter Clarke
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Re: imagination
Peter Clarke   9/3/2013 12:58:34 PM
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PowerVR the market leader in licensible graphics cores is probably more expensive than Mali graphics. Cortex-series, the leader in licensible CPU cores, is proably more expensive than MIPS cores.

You pays your money, weighs up the support infrastructures, the roadmaps and long-term prospects and makes your choice.

 

kfield
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Wearable tech today
kfield   9/9/2013 4:47:20 PM
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As a happy owner of a FitBit, it seems that wearable technology is getting closer to reality - although I do wonder about implantables....

Caleb Kraft
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Re: Wearable tech today
Caleb Kraft   9/9/2013 4:50:47 PM
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I know plenty of diabetics that would kill for a simple implanted blood tester.

resistion
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Easy foundry connection
resistion   2/3/2014 9:29:42 AM
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Now that Sanjay Jha is CEO of GlobalFoundries, Ineda has an inside track there, it seems.

Mohan.R.
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Re: Easy foundry connection
Mohan.R.   2/21/2014 11:20:42 PM
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Much as i like the concept of a platform for wearable computing, the significant power consumption on the wireless side is still a challenge. Bio-inspired, analogue circuit designs are probably the only way for Healthcare applications. Similarly, other applications should do lot more power efficient designs that are specific to that application. A platform approach would reach its limitation soon....not difficult for the ARMs of the world to catch up...

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